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ART SCI PARTICLES
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ART SCI PARTICLES
In active response to the novel coronavirus and its unfolding, we offer ArtSci PARTICLES interviews with members of our concentric network. We are deeply inspired by the thoughts, actions, and research-based responses made by our community in this unprecedented time. 
EPISODE 8 //


STEPHANIE ROTHENBERG


ABOUT THIS EPISODE:
 
 
This ArtSci Particle features Stephanie Rothenberg, joining us from Buffalo, New York. Stephanie begins with a potent discussion of her work which is then followed by a conversation with Victoria about the necessity of sentience during this time, asking, “what senses do we still have available that allow us to remain connected?” Stephanie engages this question with her students and with her practice, working with social justice organizations, city planners and stakeholders to make artwork that has potential to effect change and help drive public and social progress. Stephanie also shares her perspective of teaching during this challenging time, considering how she can continue to empower and support her students on a virtual platform.
 

ABOUT STEPHANIE
ROTHENBERG

 

Stephanie Rothenberg’s interdisciplinary art draws from digital culture, science and economics to explore relationships between human designed systems and biological ecosystems. Moving between real and virtual spaces her work investigates the power dynamics of techno utopias, global economics and outsourced labor. She has exhibited throughout the US and internationally in venues including Eyebeam (US), Sundance Film Festival (US), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art / MASS MoCA (US), House of Electronic Arts / HeK (CH), LABoral (ES), Transmediale (DE), and ZKM Center for Art & Media (DE). She is a recipient of numerous awards, most recently from the Harpo Foundation and Creative Capital. Residencies include ZK/U Zentrum für Kunst und Urbanistik in Berlin, TOKAS / Tokyo Art and Space, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace, Eyebeam Art and Technology and the Santa Fe Art Institute. Her work is in the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art and has been widely reviewed including Artforum, Artnet, The Brooklyn Rail and Hyperallergic. She is an ongoing participant and organizer in the MoneyLab research project at the Institute of Network Cultures and co-organizer of the 2018 MoneyLab 5 symposium that took place in Buffalo, NY. She is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Art at SUNY Buffalo where she co-directs the Platform Social Design Lab, an interdisciplinary design studio collaborating with local social justice organizations.

Learn More about Stephanie's Work Here >>

STEPHANIE'S PROJECTS 
(MENTIONED IN THE INTERVIEW)
Aphrodisiac in the Machine (currently in progress):
An environmental science fiction that explores the ethics and economics of bioengineering nonhuman life for human survival. Merging fact and fiction, this multimedia project expands on the libidinous myth of the oyster, a hermaphroditic organism, that is being bioengineered in a futuristic aquaculture farm. The intersexual cyborg oysters convert toxic water into an aphrodisia-inducing fluid that is piped into municipal water sources. Could the creation of more sentient humans be a way to stop climate change?
Proof of Soil (2019):
A contaminated landscape is repurposed with microbial fuel cells to speculate on a not-so-distant future economy that runs on nonhuman labor. Computers powered by microbes crunch algorithms on the blockchain that produces cryptocurrency.
 
Trading Systems: Bio-Economic Fairy Tales (2018):
Taking the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico as the focal point, the project asks: what might it look like if nonhuman forces could be put in the driver’s seat during reconstruction? Contained within these pseudo-technical diagrams and plastic terrarium installations is a hopeful vision of the potential to create new models of world-making.
 
Garden of Virtual Kinship (2015)
A robotic garden becomes a data visualization using the metaphor of a garden and its struggle to survive to explore the complex relationship of economic growth to human life.
Planthropy (2015)       
A collection of robotic hanging plants whose lifeline is dependent on Twitter posts about why people donate. The project questions how philanthropy is justified through the attention economy
OTHER RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE PODCAST
Activist Naomi Klein on Democracy Now: Coronavirus Capitialism
Design researcher Catherine D’ignazio: Data Feminism
Scholar Jason W. Moore
Capitalism in the Web of Life: Ecology and the Accumulation of Capital (introduction to book)
MORE TO CHECK OUT!

LEONARDO / ISAST
COVID-19 RAPID RESPONSE TOOLKIT FOR ART AND SOCIAL CONNECTING

Our friends at Leonardo are offering virtual space, creative platforms and partnership to facilitate socially connecting, even while physically distancing. This includes a curated reading list of free articles from Leonardo journal, virtual LASER programming and community resources
OPEN CALL: 
 
HEARING IS HOW WE TOUCH AT A DISTANCE (HHWTD) RADIO

Open Call for short audio submissions on the theme: Uncovering. The word uncovering feels particularly relevant right now. The etymology of apocalypse is an uncovering or revelation.

The deadline for submissions is Monday 27th April at 12 noon Central European Time. The episode will be broadcast on Tuesday 27th April at 12 noon Central European Time.

Submissions should be sent to: hhwtd.radio@gmail.com
 

The UCLA ArtSci Collective comes together as a hybrid organism consisting of artists, scientists, humanitarians, ecologists, creative technologists and generally inquisitive humans all around the world. If you would like to be involved, please reach out to artscicenter@gmail.com
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