Copy
  1. UKRI progress report briefing note
  2. NHSF contributions to UKRI roadmap development
  3. NHSF Blog - What can Heritage Science do for you?
  4. NHSF Blog - How to Hack Heritage Science!
  5. Launch of UKRI and Research Council Delivery Plans
  6. ICOMOS Open Archive: Eprints on Cultural Heritage
  7. ALLEA E-Humanities Working Group - call for contributions
  8. Getty Conservation Institute Microfading Tester Report
  9. CHARISMA Broadband Multispectral Imaging Protocols Upgrade
  10. Art Fund 'Calm and Collected' report
  11. White paper: the carbon footprint of museums
  12. ‘Historic England Research’ digital magazine – heritage science special
  13. Age of Revolution: grants for museums and schools
  14. Royal Academy talks: When science meets art
  15. Call for papers: The Fragment in the Digital Age - Opportunities and risks of new conservation-restoration techniques
  16. Digital Asset Manager – Historic England
  17. Zeno Karl Schindler/MINIARE Fellow (Research Assistant) Non-invasive analysis of illuminated manuscripts, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
  18. Senior Conservation Scientist, Canadian Conservation Institute
1. UKRI progress report briefing note
The NHSF has prepared a summary of highlights for heritage science from the recently published progress report on UKRI’s research and innovation infrastructure roadmap work. These include the physical sciences and engineering sector and the social sciences and humanities sector. Read the summary here
 
2. NHSF contributions to UKRI roadmap development
Over the past year UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) has been mapping research and innovation infrastructure in the UK. The progress report above provides information on infrastructure and needs identified to April 2019. As a follow up to this NHSF has contributed to UKRI’s future infrastructure capability development both through the direct input from its members at various stages and via its own proposal on early stage thinking about a hub to support better translation of research to end-users.
This is an area in which NHSF has been working with other partners from the UK hub of the European Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science (E-RIHS.UK), with the goal of achieving support for a UK research and innovation infrastructure for cultural heritage .

 
3. NHSF Blog – What can Heritage Science do for you?
In March the NHSF and University of Cambridge Museums (UCM) held a one-day workshop at The British Library to explore the benefits of heritage science research in the context of collections-based research and outreach activities. The workshop included presentations and discussion of real heritage science research case studies as well as introductions to a range of analytical methods. A key session addressed the framing of research questions and how museum professionals can establish constructive dialogue with heritage scientists to achieve their research goals. On the NHSF blog you’ll find a summary of the event and a follow-up article with more detail from the workshop, including how to frame research questions and develop research projects.
 
4. NHSF Blog – How to Hack Heritage Science!
Gain an insight to this two-day Heritage Science Hackathon at UCL at Here East through this post on the NHSF blog. The event attracted attendees from many different backgrounds to work on issues faced by two local heritage institutions and as such is a great example of an initiative that delivers against the strategic framework for heritage science.
 
We welcome any information on other examples of citizen heritage science projects to add to the user-led Heritage Science Padlet - A Skilled and Diverse Community.
 
5. Launch of UKRI and Research Council Delivery Plans
The 2019-20 Delivery Plans highlight the areas of focus and key activities of UKRI and its nine constituent Councils. The plans have been developed with input from across UKRI’s research and innovation communities and build upon the Strategic Prospectus, published in May 2018, which outlined UKRI’s vision, mission and values.

Of particular interest is the AHRC Delivery Plan that sets out far-reaching ambitions for the next five years while emphasising the UK’s position as a global leader in arts and humanities research as well as the value of that research to culture, society and the economy.
 
6. ICOMOS Open Archive: Eprints on Cultural Heritage
This institutional archive aims to store all the scientific documentation produced by ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites). The repository will hold all documents published by the organisation in the past as well as all future publications and proceedings organised by ICOMOS.

It is also a subject archive open to the rest of the international scientific community in the field of historic heritage conservation. Research institutes, organisations, universities and individual researchers involved in the conservation of cultural heritage and related fields, whether members of ICOMOS or not, are encouraged to make use of and contribute to the archive.

The goal is to create a great worldwide archive specialised in the conservation, restoration, management and enhancement of cultural heritage, facilitating the dissemination and exchange of technical specialised information within the scientific community. Read more here
 
7. ALLEA E-Humanities Working Group - call for contributions
In an effort to support Open Science practices in the humanities, the ALLEA (All European Academies) E-Humanities Working Group has drafted recommendations for humanities researchers working with data, and launched an open consultation. The working group is seeking contributions from researchers and practitioners working in disciplines within the humanities, as well as policy makers and representatives of public and private organisations working in the field. The purpose of the open consultation is to gather broad feedback from active humanities researchers, in order to best tailor FAIR recommendations to the humanities.

The open consultation closes on 15th July 2019. Find out how to contribute here

For more information see the ALLEA E-Humanities Working Group home page.
 
8. Getty Conservation Institute Microfading Tester Report
In 2018, the Getty Conservation Institute convened a select group of scientists and conservators experienced with the microfading tester (MFT) to discuss the current state of the technique and to propose how its practice might be expanded in the cultural heritage field.

Among the topics addressed during the meeting were the technical aspects of MFT, including the various iterations in use, reliance upon the Blue Wool standards and its potential issues, strategies for collecting and interpreting MFT data, and how its results facilitate communication about lighting policy with museum staff.

The meeting participants also placed particular emphasis on the development of a community of MFT users. This could be achieved through sharing and access to information via training workshops, guidelines, and online didactic material, in addition to the development of regional networks of expertise by the identification of MFT users around the world.
 
The report summarises the outcomes of this discussion, and can be accessed here
 
9. CHARISMA Broadband Multispectral Imaging Protocols Upgrade
In 2013, as part of the CHARISMA project (Cultural Heritage Advanced Research Infrastructures: Synergy for a Multidisciplinary Approach to conservation and restoration), research was undertaken to develop new optimized methodologies for both the acquisition and processing of images, to improve their reproducibility and comparability.

Emphasis was placed on the use of readily available equipment and creating a set of user-friendly practical materials and resources, aimed at a broad range of users and to be as accessible as possible.

The outcomes of this research were distilled into a set of completely open access user resources, including a User Manual and post-processing software tools, downloadable from the British Museum website.

After more than five years since the launch of these resources, the department of Scientific Research at The British Museum intends to review these in order to improve and update them, so that they continue to be relevant and in line with current best practice.

All current and former users of these resources, as well as those interested in broadband multispectral/technical imaging, are invited to participate and give their opinions and suggestions by completing this short survey. The survey will close on 30th June 2019.
 
10. Art Fund 'Calm and Collected' report
The Art Fund's new 'Calm and Collected' report has set out the ways in which museums could - and already do - impact our wellbeing. The report is based on a survey of over 2,500 adults in the UK, as well as a small number of in-depth interviews. It assesses rising levels of stress and anxiety across the UK, and the difficulties we have in creating space for ourselves. It sets out the benefits we perceive from visiting museums and galleries - including a sense of purpose, and meaning-making - and suggests that our wellbeing would be supported by more regular visits. (The Art Fund is the national fundraising charity for art and an advocate of UK museums and galleries.) Read the full report here
 
At the same time, the National Lottery Heritage Fund has been exploring ways in which museums can contribute towards the Five Ways to Wellbeing developed by the New Economics Foundation (NEF), with help from Arts and Minds and Cambridge University Museums. Read the NLHF article here.
 
11. White paper: the carbon footprint of museums
Sustainability in Conservation (SiC) has partnered with the Integral Group (https://www.integralgroup.com/) on a project to assess and address the issue of the carbon footprint of museums on a global scale.

The project will result in a white paper assessing the overall carbon footprint of the museum sector internationally, which will be used to raise awareness of this vital issue and create a toolkit to help museums address their own carbon footprint and outline energy savings, waste and water management.

If you are willing to participate in this project, please answer the following questions (you can cut and paste) and return to: sustainabilityinconservation@gmail.com.

Please fill out as much information as possible, if you do not know/cannot find the answers to some of the questions, then you can leave them blank. Any data you can provide is very much appreciated.
 
  1. Type of museum: 
  2. Geographical location of museum: 
  3. Size of museum (please indicate square footage or square meters): 
  4. Gas use:  
  5. Electricity use: 
  6. Electric bill (per month, please indicate which month): 
  7. Are you interested in participating in the pilot project for the tool kit?: 
https://www.sustainabilityinconservation.com/
 
12. ‘Historic England Research’ digital magazine – heritage science special
Historic England has published a special issue of its digital magazine ‘Historic England Research’ focusing on examples of the ways heritage science can help us better conserve and understand both archaeological and built heritage.

You can access the magazine either as a PDF download or as web pages within Historic England’s ‘Latest Research’ feature here.

The issue features examples of multi-disciplinary working and international collaboration (submerged wreck, the Rooswijk), through an examination of evidence for past environments in the inter-tidal zone, to uses of Geophysical Survey data, and articles focused on improving conservation methods for historic buildings.
 
13. Age of Revolution: grants for museums and schools
The Age of Revolution project is a national partnership, using digitised museum and heritage collections from across the UK to bring classroom learning about the people, events and ideas of this exceptional period of history to life.

The project is offering funding for an exciting new digital learning opportunity. The Age of Revolution Project invites schools and cultural organisations to work together and use simple digital tools to produce creative outcomes, responding to the theme of ‘Revolution’. Successful project applications will be awarded up to £3000. Deadline for applications is July 12th. Find out more and how to apply here.
 
14. Royal Academy talks: When science meets art
When science meets art is a series of talks at the Royal Academy of Arts that brings together scientists and artists to explore how experimentation, curiosity and creative thinking are central to both science and art.
 
On Wednesday 26th June plant biologist Enrico Coen and artist Robert Kesseler join John O’Shea, Head of Programming at Science Gallery London, to discuss their longstanding collaboration that explores the convergence between art and biology.
 
On 25th September, mathematician Professor Marcus du Sautoy and artist Conrad Shawcross discuss how technologies can drive artistic practice and whether art can develop new approaches to science.
 
Find out more and book tickets here.
 
15. Call for Papers - The Fragment in the Digital Age: Opportunities and risks of new conservation-restoration techniques
International Symposium by the HAWK (Faculty of Architecture, Engineering and Conservation and the Hornemann Institute) in cooperation with the German National Scientific Committee for Conservation-Restoration of ICOMOS and the Verband der Restauratoren e. V. (Association of Restorers e.V.)

May 13th - 15th 2020, HAWK in Hildesheim, Germany.  Application deadline: July 31st 2019 (service@hornemann-institut.de)

The handling of the fragment is one of the central tasks of conservators-restorators.
The focus of this conference lies in what the new digital possibilities mean for the preservation and mediation of the historical fragment.

We therefore ask for one-page abstracts for lectures and posters from the different fields of conservation-restoration in museums and the preservation of historical monuments relating to:
- Basic contributions on the opportunities and risks of new techniques in conservation-restoration, with a critical evaluation of the latest developments and with suggestions on current guidelines for theory and practice.
- Current case studies on interdisciplinary cooperation between conservation-restoration experts and specialists in new media, also with regard to the mediation and presentation of fragments.
- Research projects that seek to demonstrate the scientific validity of digital models, i.e. the degree to which a digital reconstruction of a fragment is based on scientifically reliable sources.

Further information.
16. Digital Asset Manager – Historic England
Historic England is re-advertising this exciting opportunity for a Digital Asset Manager, on a 12-month fixed-term contract, helping to develop and procure a new organisational Digital Asset Management system.
 
You will help develop and implement a roadmap for the adoption of a new digital asset management system and be responsible for planning the migration and organising of our existing media, including more than 800,000 digital images, to meet our strategic digital initiatives. You will deliver a business case, procurement plan and, if appropriate, a fundraising strategy to deliver a DAM. You will be responsible for vendor selection and tendering if the business case phase is successful.
 
In return we offer a wide benefits package including a competitive pension scheme, 28 days holiday, corporate discounts, and free entry to English Heritage sites. We recognise the importance of a healthy work/life balance and therefore offer flexible working and job share arrangements. The role is based in Swindon £33,000 - £36000 + Benefits
 
Closing date for applications is 07th July 2019. Find out more and apply here
 
17. Zeno Karl Schindler/MINIARE Fellow (Research Assistant) Non-invasive analysis of illuminated manuscripts, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
A twelve-month fellowship on the non-invasive analysis of illuminated manuscripts is available at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK. The successful candidate, supported by the MINIARE Fellowship of the Zeno Karl Schindler Foundation, will join the cross-disciplinary team of the research project MINIARE (Manuscript Illumination: Non-Invasive Analysis, Research and Expertise, www.miniare.org). Based at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, MINIARE focuses on the non-invasive analyses of the materials and techniques used in Western European and Oriental illuminated manuscripts from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Under the supervision of the Fitzwilliam Museum's Senior Research Scientist and the Keeper of Manuscripts and Printed Books, the Zeno Karl Schindler / MINIARE Fellow will analyse illuminated manuscripts with a combination of non-invasive analytical tools. He/she will be trained in the combined, mutually complementary use of different imaging and analytical methods. He/she will become fully aware of the conservation needs of unique and exceptionally fragile manuscripts, as well as of the broader cultural and historical questions that the Museum's cross-disciplinary research endeavours to clarify.

Closing date for applications: Sunday 14th July 2019 (midnight).

Find out more and apply online for this vacancy

 
18. Senior Conservation Scientist at Canadian Conservation Institute, Canada
CCI is opening a senior conservation scientist position to help lead its efforts in the conservation of modern materials. This position will identify strategic issues related to synthetic polymers (and potentially other materials found prevalently in modern/contemporary cultural heritage) and will develop and lead new research projects in response to these issues. This position will provide expert advice and services and will deal with complex inquiries or requests from external or internal clients to provide authoritative scientific expertise, interpretation and results based on research and testing. This position will communicate concepts, ideas and research results to national and international client groups, scientists, conservators, other heritage professionals and non-technical individuals through written reports and publications or oral communications.

CCI encourages all qualified candidates, Canadians and non-Canadians, to apply given the fact that the number of qualified candidates is anticipated to be limited for a position of such specialized nature at that level. Closing date 2nd August.

More information about the position and hiring process can be found here
 


SIGN UP to receive the NHSF e-newsletter
 
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Share
Tweet
Forward
Copyright © 2019 National Heritage Science Forum, All rights reserved.