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EIABC - May Newsletter 
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Message from the President 

 
Hello fellow EIABC members. I would like to introduce myself. My name is Jason Rowley and as some of you are aware, I am your new president going forward for 2015.

This year for the membership will be busy with the hopeful adoption of the 23rd edition of the CEC. As mentioned, we are waiting on BC to adopt the new code and once that has happened we will strive to have our always anticipated code changes seminar. We will keep our members up to date with the time and place of the event.

The electrical sector is unique in that most everyone involved is very high end and effective at what they do. The executive is committed to supporting our membership by providing timely and relevant topics for discussion at our regularly scheduled dinner meetings. We are also hoping to add a few field trips over the next year and half as well.

Our strength is in our membership. Please do not hesitate to send all your suggestions and ideas to myself on how we, as your executive board, can better support the membership. I can be reached at
president@eiabc.org.

Enjoy the spring weather and I will see you at our May 25th dinner meeting.

Jason Rowley
President

May 2015


Inside This Issue


Message from the President
- Jason Rowley

Protection Of Electrical Conductors Against Fire
– Reality And Misconception

- Ark Tsisserev

EIA Code Article – May 2015
- Ted Simmons

 



EIA Executive

Membership Form

 

Electrical Inspector’s Association of British Columbia

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Henning Drive Burnaby,
B.C., V5C 6N5

Phone: 604-294-4123
Fax: 604-294-4120
Email: info@eiabc.org

Protection Of Electrical Conductors Against Fire
– Reality And Misconception

 
By Ark Tsisserev, P.Eng.
Ark Tsisserev is an independent electrical fire and safety 
consultant. Prior to becoming a consultant, he was an electrical safety regulator / Chief Electrical Inspector for the City of Vancouver . EFS Engineering Solutions Ltd. 
ark.tsisserev@efsengineering.ca

Although I wrote the article on this subject just over a year ago, I received a few e-mails with questions from the electrical designers and installers. All questions received could be divided into the following groups:

  1. Why do electrical designers and installers have to know about this issue, as this is the requirement of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC)?
  2. Which conductors are required to be protected against exposure to fire?
  3. If the conductors which are required to be protected and are specified by electrical designers do not comply with the circuit integrity testing requirement, how could such protection be accomplished and who is responsible for it?

Let’s try to answer these fundamental questions and per-haps to finally clarify this controversial subject matter.

The answer to question 1 Why do electrical designers and installers have to know about this issue, as this is the requirement of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC)?” is as follows:

Electrical designers and installers are responsible for compliance with the applicable requirements of the CE Code. Although in general, the CE Code does not address provisions for protection of electrical conductors against exposure to fire, such requirement exists in Rule 32-200(b) and in Rule 46-204, as these Rules cover installation of life safety equip-ment that must function in the event of a loss of normal power supply due to the fire in a building.

Appendix B Note on each of these rules provides additional clarification to the CE Code users in this regard.

Appendix G of the CE Code offers a comprehensive cross-reference between certain requirements of the Code and the relevant provisions of the NBCC. Let’s take a look at these Rules of the CE Code.

“32-200 Conductors (see Appendices B and G) Conductors from the emergency power source to a fire pump shall

  • (a) have an ampacity not less than
    (i) 125% of the full load current rating of the motor, where an individual motor is provided with the fire pump; and
    (ii) 125% of the sum of the full load currents of the fire pump, jockey pump, and the fire pump auxiliary loads, where two or more motors are provided with the fire 
    pump; and
  • (b) be protected against fire exposure to provide continued operation in compliance with the National Building Code of Canada”.

Appendix B on Rule 32-200(b)

“The intent of this Rule is to protect the feeder conductors between a fire pump and an emergency power source from fire damage. The National Building Code of Canada requires that conductors supplying life and fire safety equipment be protected against exposure to fire to ensure continued opera-tion of this equipment for a period not less than 1 h. NFPA 20 also mandates protection of circuits feeding fire pumps against possible damage by fire. The following examples illustrate acceptable methods for achieving this protection:

  • (a) using mineral-insulated cables conforming to fire rating requirements as specified in Clause 5.3 of CSA C22.2 No. 124;
  • (b) embedding the raceway containing fire pump feeder conductors in not less than 50 mm of concrete; or
  • (c) installing the raceway containing fire pump feeder conductors in a shaft enclosure or service space of at least 1 h fire resistance construction.

Specific requirements pertaining to the fire resistance rating of a material or an assembly of materials can be found in subsection 3.1.7 of the National Building Code of Canada or in the appropriate provincial/territorial legislation”.

“46-204 Protection of electrical conductors (see Appendices B and G)

All power, control, and communication conductors between an emergency generator as described in Rule 46-202(3), and electrical equipment required to be installed as a part of the emergency power supply and located outside the generator room shall be protected against fire exposure to provide continued operation in compliance with the National Building Code of Canada”.

Appendix B Note on Rule 46-204

“The intent of this Rule is to protect conductors between an emergency generator and associated electrical equipment, such as the transfer switch(es), bypass switch(es), engine control panel, etc., required to be installed as a part of the emergency power supply and located outside the generator room against exposure to fire for a period not less than 1 h. The National Building Code of Canada requires that conduc-tors supplying life and fire safety equipment be protected against such exposure. CSA C282 also mandates protection of circuits interconnecting field-installed equipment forming part of an emergency generator against possible damage by fire. The following examples illustrate acceptable methods for achieving this protection:

  • (a) using mineral-insulated cables conforming to fire rating requirements as specified in Clause 5.3 of CSA C22.2 No. 124 or other cables that comply with the ULC S139 circuit integrity test and are marked “S139” and “2 h CIR”;
  • (b) embedding the raceway containing conductors between an emergency generator and associated equipment in concrete with a thickness sufficient to provide protection of electrical conductors from fire exposure for a period of at least 1 h in compliance with the National Building Code of Canada; or
  • (c) installing the raceway containing conductors between an emergency generator and associated equipment in a shaft enclosure or service space of at least 1 h fire resistance construction”.

It is obvious, that the CE Code users have no choice, but to understand and comply with these CE Code requirements.

These CE Code users also have to understand that Subsection 3.2.7. of the NBCC mandates emergency power for specific systems and equipment that must continue to function in the event that regular power to these systems and equipment is interrupted. These specific systems are described in the NBCC and defined in Section 46 of the CE Code as “Life safety systems” as follows:

“Life safety systems – emergency lighting and fire alarm systems that are required to be provided with an emergency power supply from batteries, generators, or a combination thereof, and electrical equipment for building services such as fire pumps, elevators, smoke-venting fans, smoke control fans, and dampers that are required to be provided with an emergency power supply by an emergency generator in conformance with the National Building Code of Canada”

Articles 3.2.7.4. and 3.2.7.8. of the NBCC state that for emergency lighting and for fire alarm systems (including voice communication where voice communication is required to be provided as a part of a fire alarm system by Article 3.2.6.8.) – such emergency power source could be rep-resented by batteries or generators. These NBCC Articles further specify a minimum period of time during which such power supply sources must automatically supply the connected loads. This minimum required period varies from 5 min. for a building allowed by the NBCC to be equipped with a single zone fire alarm system – up to 2 hours, where such systems and equipment are installed in a high building. Although Articles 3.2.7.4. and 3.2.7.8. of the NBCC allow an option of using batteries or emergency generators as the emer-gency power supply source for emergency lighting and fire alarm systems, Sentence 3.2.7.9.(1) of the NBCC specifically mandates use of an emergency generator capable of operating under a full load for not less than 2 h as an emergency power supply source for a very particular life safety equipment dis-cussed in my last article (i.e. for elevators, smoke control and smoke venting equipment in a high building and for electri-cally connected fire pumps installed in any building).

Thus, it is also obvious that in addition to the CE Code requirement for fire protection of conductors supplying a fire pump from an emergency generator or conductors between the emergency generator and the automatic transfer switch, certain conductors supplying equipment comprising “life safety systems” also must be protected against fire exposure. This fact leads to the answer to the second question “Which conductors are required to be protected against exposure to fire?” This NBCC requirement is articulated in Article 3.2.7.10. as follows:

“3.2.7.10. Protection of Electrical Conductors

1) The protection of electrical and emergency conductors referred to in Clauses (a) to (c) shall conform to the requirements stated in Sentences (2) to (8):
  • a) electrical conductors located within buildings
    identi
    fied in Article 3.2.6.1. serving
    i) fire alarms,
    ii) emergency lighting, or
    iii) emergency equipment within the scope of Articles 3.2.6.2. to 3.2.6.8.
  • b) emergency conductors serving fire pumps required to be installed under Article 3.2.5.18., and
  • c) electrical conductors serving mechanical systems serving
    i) areas of refuge identified in Clause 3.3.3.6.(1)(b), or
    ii) contained use areas identified in Clauses
    3.3.3.7.(4)(a) and (b).
2) Except as otherwise required by Sentence (3) and permit-ted by this Article, electrical conductors that are used in conjunction with systems identified in Sentence (1) shall
  • a) conform to ULC-S139, “Fire Test for Evaluation of Integrity of Electrical Cables,” including the hose stream application, to provide a circuit integrity rat-ing of not less than 1 h, or
  • b) be located in a service space that is separated from the remainder of the building by a fire separation that has a fire-resistance rating not less than 1 h.
3) Electrical conductors identified in Clause (1)(c) shall
  • a) conform to ULC-S139, “Fire Test for Evaluation of Integrity of Electrical Cables,” including the hose stream application, to provide a circuit integrity rating of not less than 2 h, or
  • b) be located in a service space that is separated from the remainder of the building by a fire separation that has a fire-resistance rating not less than 2 h.

4) The service spaces referred to in Clauses (2)(b) and (3)(b) shall not contain any combustible materials other than the conductors being protected.

5) Except as stated in Sentences (7) and (9), the electrical conductors referred to in Sentence (1) are those that extend from the source of emergency power to a) the equipment served, or

b) the distribution equipment supplying power to the equipment served, if both are in the same room (see Appendix A).

6) If a fire alarm transponder or annunciator in one fire compartment is connected to a central processing unit or another transponder or annunciator located in a different fire compartment, the electrical conductors connecting them shall be protected in accordance with Sentence (2).

7) Fire alarm system branch circuits within a storey that connect transponders and individual devices need not conform to Sentence (2). (See Appendix A.)

8) Except as permitted in Sentence (9), if a distribution panel supplies power to emergency lighting, the power supply conductors leading up to the distribution panel shall be protected in accordance with Sentence (2).

9) Conductors leading from a distribution panel referred to in Sentence (8) to emergency lighting units in the same storey need not conform to Sentence (2)”

If one will carefully examine Article 3.2.7.10. of the NBCC, it could be seen from this Article that the NBCC man-dates protection of certain electrical conductors for a period of not less than 1 h and certain electrical conductors for a period of not less than 2 h. For example, it could be seen that in a high building - riser conductors supplying fire alarm system and emergency lighting from an emergency power source or conductors supplying elevators, smoke control fans and dampers from an emergency generator, must be protected against exposure to fire for a period of not less than 1 h. It could be seen as well that such 1 h fire protection is required between an emergency generator and a fire pump in any building where an electrically connected fire pump is installed.

It could be also seen that the conductors supplying the mechanical ventilation equipment installed in areas of refuge in compartments that contain operating or delivery rooms or intensive care units in a health care facility (regardless whether the building containing such facilities is classified as a high building or not) or conductors supplying the mechanical ventilation equipment installed in a contained use are of a jail/prison – must be protected against exposure to fire for not less than 2 h. So, a detailed analysis of the NBCC Article will help the electrical designers and installers to make a correct decision in protecting electrical conductors against fire exposure.

Now is the time to deal with the third question “If the conductors which are required to be protected and are specified by electrical designers do not comply with the circuit integrity testing requirement, how such protection could be accomplished and who is responsible for it?”

It could be also seen from Article 3.2.7.10. of the NBCC that the required fire protection of conductors could be accomplished by two methods:

1. By selecting conductors that conform to the “Fire Test for Evaluation of Integrity of Electrical Cables” prescribed by the standard ULC S139 or by placing the conductors required such fire protection in a “service space” separated from the remainder of the building by a fire separation that has a fire resistance rating not less than 1 h (or not less than 2 h in case of conductors supplying mechanical ventilation equipment in refuge areas of health care facilities or in contained use areas of a jail).

Of course, it is the responsibility of electrical designers to specify conductors that conform to the ULC S139 fire test and to ensure that such conductors are marked: “CIR” 2 h ULC S139, if fire protection of conductors is chosen to com-ply with this ULC S139 test.

It should be noted that the ULC has reinstated its certification program for circuit integrity cables and that in addition to a MI cable, other available circuit integrity cables on the

market (i.e. “Draka”, Lifeline”, etc.) with the above refer-enced marking on the cable outer jacket are deemed to be considered as being protected against exposure to fire for 2 h in accordance with Clause 6.1A of ULC S139. The link below provides the latest information on UL/ULC listing of cables that have been tested to ULC standard ULC S139. When such cables are specified in electrical design, these cables do not have to be placed in 1 h rated service spaces.

http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/cgifind.new/ LISEXT/1FRAME/srchres.html

2.  By discussing with the building code experts (with architects or building code engineers) the best appropriate means to install such conductors in “service spaces”. It should be noted that a term “service space” is defined by the NBCC as follows: “service space means space provided in a building to facilitate or conceal the installation of building service facilities such as shuts, ducts, pipes, shafts or wires”. Use of this defined term in conjunction with requirements of Sentences 3.2.7.10.(2)(b) or (3)(b) as shown above has created further confusion in the industry. If these protected conductors must be located only in serv-ice spaces, and such service spaces do not include service rooms (where life safety equipment or where emergency distribution equipment to which such conductors have to be connected), then it appears that the conductors required fire protection against exposure to fire cannot be installed in the electrical service rooms. The proposal to revise these two Sentences of Article 3.2.7.10. by including “service rooms” in these Sentences has been sent to the NRC technical staff. Meanwhile, the industry practitioners consider that fire rated service rooms that contain emergency distribution equipment or life safety equipment to which such conduc-tors must be terminated, meet the NBCC provision for pro-tection of electrical conductors against exposure to fire.

In conclusion it should be noted that specific requirements of the local Codes, By-Laws, Bulletins, Directives or regulatory interpretations on the subject of protection of electrical conductors against exposure to fire – must be taken into account.

Ark Tsisserev is President of EFS Engineering Solutions Ltd., an electrical and fire safety consulting company, and is a registered professional engineer with a master’s degree in Electrical Engineering. Prior to becoming a consultant, Ark was an electrical safety regulator and Chief Electrical Inspector for the City of Vancouver. He is currently the Chair of the Technical Committee for the Canadian Electrical Code and represents the CE Code Committee on the CMP-1 of the National Electrical Code. Ark can be reached by e-mail at ark.tsisserev@efsengineering.ca.

EIA Code Article – May 2015
By Ted Simmons 
Ted is the Chief Instructor, Electrical Apprenticeship Program - British Columbia Institute of Technology and is a member of the CSA Part 1 Code Committee. Ted_Simmons@bcit.ca
 
In the previous article we reviewed the changes made to Sections 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, and 26. In this article, we will complete our review of the changes made to the 2012 CEC and will focus our attention on the revisions made to Sections 30, 32, 36, 46, 50, 62, 68, 72, 80 and 86.

Section 30 – Installation of lighting equipment

Rule 30-308 – Circuit connections

Subrule (4) has been revised to indicate that it applies to fluorescent luminaires

utilizing double-ended lamps. The rule was further revised to identify the alternate methods permitted to provide the disconnecting means between the branch circuit conductors and the luminaire conductors such as mated separable wire connectors approved for the purpose, etc..

Section 32 – Fire alarm systems, fire pumps, and carbon monoxide alarms

Rule 32-102 – Wiring methods


Studies have shown that RPVC provides an equivalent level of protection as that of EMT or similar wiring methods when exposed to a building fire. As a result, the previous requirement to have RPVC embedded in 50mm of masonry or poured concrete has been removed. It should be noted however, that RPVC is still required to be embedded in at least 50mm of masonry or poured concrete when used for the wiring of a fire pump.

As noted in Subrule 30-102(d), it appears the restriction for encasement in masonry or concrete was also removed for electrical non-metallic tubing, however this was an editorial error which has since been corrected by the errata that accompanies the Code. Please ensure this error is corrected in your Code book.

Rule 32-208 – Transfer switch

In order to provide for continuity of service for the fire pump, Subrule 32-208(1)(a) has been added to clearly indicate where a transfer switch is used to provide emergency power to fire pump equipment, the transfer switch will be used solely for the fire pump.

Section 36 – High-voltage installations

Rule 36-214 – Disconnecting means


In the past, the Code required high-voltage switch contacts to be visible in both the open and closed positions. As a result of equipment design changes, it may not be possible for visible inspection of the switch contacts in the closed position.

Therefore, the requirement for visible inspection in the closed position has been removed from Subrule (2).

Section 46 – Emergency power supply, unit equipment, exit signs, and life safety
systems

Rule 46-108 – Wiring methods


As noted previously in Rule 32-102, studies have shown that RPVC provides an equivalent level of protection as that of EMT or similar wiring methods when exposed to a building fire. As a result, Subrule (2)(c) has been revised to permit the use of rigid non-metallic conduit without being embedded in 50mm of masonry or poured concrete. It should be noted however, in situations where the NBCC requires 2 hour fire protected feeders, concrete encasement is still required.

Subrule (3)(b) was added to clarify that totally enclosed non-metallic raceways are an approved wiring method in buildings of combustible construction.

Rule 46-204 – Protection of electrical conductors

This rule was added to the Code to ensure the conductors between an emergency generator and associated electrical equipment such as transfer switches, control panels, etc. which may be located outside of the emergency generator room are protected from exposure to fire. As noted in Appendix “B”, the National Building Code of Canada requires that conductors supplying life and fire safety equipment shall be protected against fire exposure for a period of at least 1 hour. The new note in Appendix “B” provides examples for achieving this protection such as: using mineral-insulated cables conforming to the fire rating requirements as specified in Clause 5.3 of CSA C22.2 No.124, embedding the raceway containing the conductors in concrete, or installing the raceway containing the conductors in a shaft enclosure or service space of at least 1 hour fire resistance construction.

Section 50 – Solar photovoltaic systems

Rule 50-004 – Marking


In order to align with the new requirements in Rule 50-006, Subrule (b) has been revised and now requires the maximum photovoltaic source voltage to be marked on the disconnecting means for the photovoltaic output circuit.

Rule 50-006 – Maximum photovoltaic source circuit and output circuit voltage

In order to ensure the voltage ratings for cables and equipment used with photovoltaic systems are not exceeded, Rule 50-006 has been added to Section 50. The new rule provides two methods for determining the maximum PV source circuit and output circuit voltage. Subrule (1) permits the voltage to be determined using the rated open-circuit voltage multiplied by 125%. Alternatively, Subrule (2) permits the voltage to be calculated using the rated open circuit voltage, the difference between 25°C and the lowest expected daily minimum temperature for the installation area and a voltage temperature coefficient specified by the manufacturer.

Rule 50-008 – Voltage drop

Voltage drop is a major consideration in any solar PV system. As a result, Rule 50-008 has been added to the Code and provides the following 4 Subrules which identify acceptable methods for calculating voltage drop.
  • (a) indicates the voltage drop is considered acceptable when the conductors are rated not less than 125% of the maximum available short-circuit current of the solar PV system.
  • (b) requires the voltage drop not exceed 5% of the rated operating voltage.
  • (c) requires that the rated operating voltage drop shall not exceed the percentage calculated by multiplying 50% of the rated current of the PV source circuit under consideration divided by the rated current of the total array connected to the power conditioning unit or directly to the loads.
  • (d) requires the resistance to be sufficiently low to facilitate the operation of the overcurrent device protecting the circuit in the event of a short circuit.

Rule 50-010 – Ampere rating of PV source circuits

Subrule (1)(a) has been revised to indicate that the ampere rating of a PV source circuit shall be the ampere rating of the overcurrent device protecting the circuit or the ampacity of the conductors, whichever is less. In addition, Subrule (1)(b) indicates the ampere rating shall not be less than 125% of the rated short-circuit current of the PV source’s circuit. Subrule (2) pertains to the application of Rule 8-104 and specifies the continuous load shall be considered to be 125% of the rated short-circuit current.

Rule 50-012 – Overcurrent protection for apparatus and conductors

Subrule (2) has been added and indicates where overcurrent protection is required by Subrule (1), each PV source circuit shall be protected by an individual overcurrent device rated or set at not more than the allowable ampacity of the conductors of the PV source circuit, or the maximum overcurrent protection indicated on the panel nameplates, whichever is less.

Rule 50-014 – Photovoltaic dc arc-fault protection

This rule has been added to address the safety concerns related to PV system fires caused by arcing faults. As noted in Subrule (1), the Code requires photovoltaic systems with dc source circuits, or both, on or penetrating a building and operating at a maximum system voltage of 80V or greater, to be protected by a dc arc-fault circuit interrupter or other system equipment approved to provide equivalent protection in accordance with the requirements outlined in Subrule (2).

Rule 50-018 – Wiring methods

This rule has been expanded considerably and now contains “9” Subrules. The following methods are now recognized for the interconnection of PV panels within an array:
  • flexible cords suitable for extra hard usage
  • conductors approved as part of an approved panel in accordance with the
  • provisions outlined in Subrule (3)
  • type RPVU conductors in accordance with the provisions of Subrule (4)
Subrule (7) has been added and requires conductors and cables for solar PV systems on or above a building to meet the flame spread requirements of the NBCC or local bylaws.

Subrule (8) requires types RPV and RPVU conductors to be contained in a raceway when installed inside a building or structure.

Rule 50-020 – Attachment plugs and similar wiring devices

This rule was added to recognize the use of attachment plugs to connect cable between modules and panels provided the wiring devices comply with the requirements outlined in Subrule (1). Where the attachment plugs and similar devices installed in accordance with Subrule (1) are readily accessible and are used in circuits operating at over 30V, Subrule (2) requires the devices to be of a type that requires the use of a tool to open the connector.

Rule 50-026 – Solar photovoltaic systems grounding

This rule has been revised to direct Code users to Section 64 regarding the grounding requirements for PV systems. ie: Rules 64-016, 64-018 and 64-020.

Rule 50-028 – Power conditioning unit

This rule was also revised to direct Code users to Section 64 regarding the requirements for power conditioning units. ie: Rules 64-102 to 64-114.

Section 62 – Fixed electric space and surface heating systems.

Rule 62-102 – Special terminology

Definitions have been added to Section 62 for “infrared radiant heater” and “infrared radiant heater of the metal-sheath glowing element type”. Infrared radiant heaters function in a manner similar to the sun. The heater produces rays that travel through the air without heating it, and when the rays contact a surface or person, the radiant energy is converted into heat. Infrared electric heaters are used in many applications and are ideal for task-specific heating. New installation requirements for infrared heaters of the metal- sheath glowing element type have been added to the Code in Rule 62-226.

Rule 62-116 – Demand factors for service conductors and feeders.

For many years there have been questions as to what demand factor should be applied to the load for an electric furnace when performing calculations to determine service conductor or feeder ampacities. In order to address this issue, Subrule (3) has been added to clarify that where service conductors or feeders are used to supply an electric thermal storage heating system, duct heater, or an electric furnace, the connected heating load shall be calculated at 100% demand factor.

Rule 62-202 – Temperature control.

In order to be consistent with the requirements for wall switches near bathtubs or shower stalls as outlined in Rule 30-320(3), two new Subrules have been added to Rule 62-202.

Subrule (2) requires that a manually operated control for an electric heater in a bathroom be located at least 1m from the bathtub or shower stall. Where it is not possible to obtain the 1m clearance due to the design of the bathroom, Subrule (3) permits the manually operated control for the heater to be located not less than 500mm from the bathtub or shower stall, provided that it is supplied from a circuit protected by a GFCI of the Class A type, or supplied from a Class 2 circuit operating at not more than 42.4V peak or dc.

Rule 62-208 – Installation of central units.

To enhance the safety of persons installing or maintaining central units, such as an electric furnace, this Rule has been expanded to include three new requirements pertaining to the provision of a disconnecting means for the central unit. Subrule (3) now requires that a single disconnecting means that simultaneously opens all ungrounded conductors, be provided for the central unit.

In situations where the supply to the central unit and controller require more than one circuit, Subrule (4) requires the disconnecting means to be grouped together and include signage on the central unit and controller to indicate the need to isolate the multiple circuits prior to working on the central unit and controller. Subrule (5) requires the disconnecting means specified in Subrules (3) or (4) to be located within sight of and

within 9m of the central unit and controller.

Rule 62-226 – Infrared radiant heaters of the metal-sheath glowing element type.

In order to reduce the risk of a fire being started by low level electrical arcing,

Subrule (1) was added to the Code and requires ground fault protection be provided to de-energize all normally ungrounded conductors of fixed infrared radiant heaters of the metal-sheath glowing element type. Subrule (2) permits a single means of ground fault protection where multiple heaters of this type are used on the same branch circuit.

Section 68 – Pools, tubs and spas.

Rule 68-000 – Scope


There have been several questions as to whether the requirements specified in Section 68 for pools apply to splash pads. As a result, a new Item (9) has been added to Subrule (2)

to indicate that a pool shall be deemed to include splash pads.

Rule 68-050 – Special terminology

The term “splash pad” has also been included with the special terminology for Section 68 and is defined as an area designated for water play that is not intended to have standing water.

Rule 68-068 – Ground fault circuit interrupters

In previous editions of the Code, questions were often raised as to whether spas and hot tubs were required to be protected by a GFCI. In order to remove this interpretation problem, Subrule (7)(b) was revised to include spas and hot tubs and clarify they shall be GFCI protected. A new note providing further information on this requirement has been added to Appendix “B”.

Rule 68-404 – Controls and other electrical equipment

In the previous Code, the wording in this Rule required the shut-off switch to be equipped with audible and visual trouble signal devices to provide immediate warning upon actuation of the emergency shut-off switch. This is generally not possible and as a result, Subrule (4)(e) has been revised to permit field wiring of the audible and visual trouble signal actuation devices.

Section 72 – Mobile home and recreational vehicle parks

Rule 72-110 – Connection facilities for recreational vehicles and mobile homes


Diagram 1 which identifies the CSA configurations for non-locking receptacles has been revised to include the TT-30R configuration which is commonly used for the connection of recreational vehicles. As a result of this change, the reference in

Subrule 72-110(1)(c) to receptacle type NEMA Standard WD6, Figure TT receptacle and the corresponding note in Appendix “B” have been removed.

Section 80 – Cathodic protection.

Rule 80-008 – Branch circuit


In previous editions of the Code, Subrule 80-008(c) required the rectifier for the cathodic protection system to be supplied from a switch or circuit breaker capable of being locked in the ON position. The reason for this requirement was to minimize the possibility of damage to structures should the cathodic protection system be inadvertently shut off. With the advent of modern technology for monitoring the operation of cathodic protection systems, this is no longer necessary and as a result Subrule (c) has been deleted.

Rule 80-010 – Disconnecting means

This is a new rule and was added to the Code to enhance the safety of persons performing maintenance on cathodic protection systems. In order to ensure there is access to the disconnecting means, Subrule (1) requires that a separate disconnecting means be installed at a point readily accessible to users and within sight of and within 15m of the rectifier unit for the cathodic protection system. Subrule (2) permits the disconnecting means required by Subrule (1) to be integral to the rectifier provided:
  • the disconnecting means is equipped with barriers or other suitable means to
  • prevent contact with live parts, and
  • the rectifier enclosure is equipped with a lockable cover to prevent access to unauthorized persons.
Subrule (3) requires that the disconnecting means for the cathodic protection system be labeled in a conspicuous, legible and permanent manner.

Section 86 – Electric vehicle charging systems

Rule 86-100 – Special terminology


Electric vehicle inlet – this definition was revised to clarify that the electric vehicle inlet is not considered part of the electric vehicle charging equipment.

Rule 86-106 – Permanently connected and cord-connected equipment

This is a new rule and was added to clarify that Rules 86-300 to 86-404 apply to both permanently connected, as well as cord connected, electric vehicle charging equipment.

Rule 86-306 – Receptacles for electric vehicle charging equipment

In order to prevent other equipment from being plugged into the receptacle for the electric vehicle charger, Subrule (1)(a) has been revised to require a single receptacle.

Rule 86-308 – Electric vehicle as electric power production source

This rule was introduced to the Code to address issues associated with the use of electric vehicles as an electric power production source. As noted in Subrule (2), when an electric vehicle is used for this purpose, the installation must comply with the requirements outlined in Section 84.

Rule 86-400 – Indoor charging sites

A new Subrule (3) was added and requires that electric vehicle charging equipment installed in commercial garages, or on premises of flammable liquid and gas dispensing and service facilities, as described in Section 20, must comply with Rule 20-114 and must not be located in the hazardous areas described in Rule 20-102.

This completes our review of the revisions to the 2012 CEC. In the next article, we will begin the review of the changes to the 2015 CEC.

 
Check the EIA website for important updates, events, and news. 

http://www.eiabc.org
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