Copy
The Book that Changed My Habits
View this email in your browser
Let's Work Together
Share
Tweet
Forward
+1
Share

Learning Rebels Book Review
The Book that Changed My Habits

September 15, 2015
Rarely do you read a book that lingers with you. One that you can't shake, and hints at the perimeters of your mind. This is that book. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

To be honest, I hadn't given habits and the psychology behind them much thought. I knew my habits had been formed from a lifetime of learning, unlearning, and relearning. But to think that habits had triggers? Who knew? This is a book that keeps me returning and I learn something new every time but here are my top 7 take-aways that I hope will convince you to add it to your reading list. 
My Top 7 Notes
  1. The process within our brains is a three step loop. First a cue, a trigger that tells your brain to go into auto mode. Second, there's a routine which can be physical or mental then third, there is reward. This helps your brain figure out if this routine is worth remembering. 
  2. Anyone can use this three step loop to create habits of your own by creating a reward centered around an endorphin rush. 
  3. Habits are so strong and shape our lives far more than we realize - they cause our brains to cling to them at the exclusion of all else, including common sense.  
  4. Habits create neurological cravings. They emerge gradually and we're often blind to their influence. be as we associate cues with rewards we develop a subconscious craving that starts the habit loop. 
  5. Cravings are what drive habits and figuring out how to spark a craving makes creating a new habit easier. 
  6. In order to change a habit, you must keep the old cue and deliver the old reward but insert a new routine. You can't extinguish a bad habit, you can only change it. 
  7. Willpower isn't a skill, it's a muscle and it gets tired as it works harder so there's less power left for other things. 
BONUS: How willpower becomes a habit: Choosing a a certain behavior ahead of time, then following that routine when a pain point arrives. Decide ahead of time how to react to a cue. (Don't take my word for it, see what others are saying!)

Latest Blog Ramblings


Let's think about chat's differently. 
Be a better participant! 
Let's Work Together
Yowza! Someone sent me this awesome newsletter ~ Sign me up!
Share
Tweet
+1
Share
Forward
Copyright © 2015 Learning Rebels, LLC, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences