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Week Six, a third of the way!
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Hello from the crew!

It's been six weeks, thought we'd introduce ourselves

This is the crew! From the left to the right it's Becca, Kayla, Marie, Michael, Olivia, and Ian. We were finally able to snap a picture right before lunch today. We're standing right next to the community garden plots and in front of the fall brassica field we planted today. Oh, and don't forget Toby the truck on the far far right. 

This crew has been working gleefully in the fields handling every single vegetable you take from your box to your table. Everything from planting, tending, weeding, harvesting, washing, and packing. This week we've been hard at work getting crops ready for the fall, planting broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce heads, swiss chard, and cherry tomatoes (in the hoophouse).

Because the CSA pickup this year is structured such that you pick up a prepackaged box instead of filling your own box at the farm (like last year), I miss seeing many of you! And I think many of you might miss seeing the fields the vegetables are growing from. So in this newsletter, I'd like to take you on a photo tour of the farm:

The one and only garlic harvest of the season happened on Wednesday. This garlic has been growing in the field since last fall, when we planted bulbs we had saved from the previous harvest. We have both hardneck and softneck varieties. But first they must cure! You'll see them in your boxes soon. The picture on the right is where we planted buckwheat in preparation to plant fall spinach. The lush, fast growth of the buckwheat plant will provide plenty of food for the microbes to digest and turn into healthy nutrients.
The winter squash field is bumpin. The bees are buzzin. Soon (okay, still a ways out...) there will be winter squash! I just wanted to give you a preview of how beautiful the field looks.

On the right is a crop that is much nearer in our future: tomatoes. I saw a few ripe ones today as we mowed in-between the rows. Give it a week or two and they'll be popping up in the boxes. It's the climax of the season in my mind!
We had many visitors on the farm this week. The picture on the left is of Linda Halley, Farm Manager at Gardens of Eagan and farm mentor to Seeds Farm. We enjoyed picking her brain, digging into her vast experience growing vegetables. We learned how to keep cabbage loopers off of our broccoli, about nutrient deficiencies in tomatoes, about helpful cultivation tools, about packing CSA boxes, and other joys of farming.

We also hosted 30 YMCA kids out to the farm on Monday (the hot day). We looked at the animals together, chatted about where our food comes from, and harvested potato beetles for the chickens! We had a contest who could pick the most. Despite the photo of the girl sticking out her tongue in disgust while holding a handful of potato beetles, they did have a good time. The kids got to harvest their own lettuce for a snack. I've never seen so many kids like salad.
On your left you see the many varieties of kale. Redgor, Red Russian, Vates, and Dino (named after dinosaurs, no joke). On the right you'll see the onions, which got a drink of water this week. We've been having great rain up until now, so we've spent a great deal of time moving our irrigation rig around. 
Collards and swiss chard on the left, zucchini and summer squash on the right. We plant marigolds amongst the zucchini to keep away the cucumber beetles. I think it works pretty swell.
You won't see any peas in your boxes this week. That's because they went to the pigs, and the pigs were grateful.

On the right you'll see the crew planting brassicas with our transplanter.
What will you see in your box this week?
(as always, this list is written the night before harvest, so don't take my word EXACTLY)
  • Carrots for some, eggplant for others (switch next week)
  • Herbs
  • Kale
  • Head lettuce
  • Summer squash
  • Zucchini
  • Napa Cabbage
  • Fennel
  • Cooking celery (not your stereotypical eating celery, try making a stock with it or cooking with it)
  • String Beans

Green Bean Salad With Walnuts, Fennel, and Goat Cheese

Ingredients
1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for the water
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 pounds green beans, trimmed
1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced into half-moons (1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups)
3/4 cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
1 4-ounce log fresh goat cheese, crumbled
Directions
1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the mustard, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Gradually add the oil and whisk until well combined; set aside.

2.Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add the green beans and cook until just tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain, run under cold water to cool, and set aside until you’re ready to assemble the salad.
In a large bowl, combine the green beans, fennel, and walnuts. Add the goat cheese and vinaigrette just before serving. Toss well and serve at room temperature or chilled.

 

Missed a newsletter? Don't worry, they're all uploaded onto the website. Visit seedsfarmproject.com, and click 2014 newsletter archive under the archive tab. Or follow this link.
Don't forget to add the CSA member potluck to your busy summer calendars, August 21! Looking forward to seeing those who can make it.
Seeds Farm © 

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