Copy
Make This Your Last Time | Bar Exam Preparation
<<First Name>>,

There’s this weird phenomenon where you meet someone new and then 1 second later it’s impossible to remember each other's names.
 
If I didn’t care about them 10 seconds ago, I’m not gonna care about them all of a sudden as if they were my newborn (whom I’d name Genghis so I don’t forget).
 
But what can I say? It’s impressive, for that exact reason, when someone actually remembers your name in conversation without having to say “sorry what was your name again? I’m so terrible with names hahahahaha.”

Memorizing (or more directly, remembering) is still an unavoidable base requirement for succeeding on your essays and the MBE.

And the fact is, your bar exam requires you to remember a LOT. The typical brain is made for processing data but not so much for forcing discrete information to be inscribed into your memory forever.

However, the brain is great at absorbing experiences and making powerful connections: When the same neurons get used over and over, or certain neurons get triggered hard, the connection gets stronger; as those neurons are fed that input less and less, the connection drops. Sounds like, you know, a muscle.

Put simply, you can train your brain to remember the important stuff through repetition. No wonder habit evidence is more powerful than character evidence!


Frequency of recall and attempts to recall are the basis of all memorization.

Not just being familiar with the rules, not reading them and saying “yeah, I know this”—but recalling and attempting to recall. [Click to tweet]

Here’s a fairly common trap: relying too much on memorizing.

I get it. It feels safe. It feels like the way to do it. Memorizing rules is needed after all.

But the test isn’t about whether you can memorize rules. It’s not even really about whether you can recall the rules.
Recalling (in the right context) is part of it... and it is table stakes. A cost of entry. A minimum requirement. Everyone does it, and everyone is obsessed with it.

It’s about whether you can identify the relevant issues. It’s whether you can use the rules to come to the right conclusion (including one where you say "I'd need more info"). You could collect all the bullets you want, but can you hit the target?

Answer this before you move on: Frequency of ______ and ______ are the basis of all memorization.

With that said, the following are some ways you can use to solidify that hazy jumble of rules in your head.
  1. Test yourself through recall in real situations (USE THEM. “Only knowledge that is used sticks in your mind.”)
  2. Understand the concepts (UNDERSTAND TO LEARN. MEMORIZATION IS A SIDE EFFECT OF THAT.)
  3. Rote memorize (SOMETIMES YOU'LL STILL NEED TO DO THIS)
  4. Shock yourself (MAKE IT STICKY)
  5. When do you start memorizing? Do you memorize or practice? Should you memorize everything?

See this post for more details for each:
 
Read: Memorizing for the Bar Exam: How to Remember and Recite the Rules

What do you think will make the biggest difference in your studies?

How do you plan to approach memorization?

Let me know. I want to hear your thoughts on this heated topic.

Brian
 
Recommended Tools
Click here to see catalog
Magicsheets (condensed outlines)
Not retaining any information from your bar course? Not enough time? Stop getting overwhelmed. Focus on practice and memorization with these condensed rule outlines organized in logical groups and indentations.

Approsheets (essay approach checklists and flowcharts)
Go from blank page to finished essay/outline. Identify all the relevant issues with these attack sheets so you don't leave any points on the table.
 
Passer’s Playbook 2.0 (self-study tools)
Step-by-step blueprint, study schedules, cheat sheets, guides, and other tools designed to help you orient yourself and propel you toward improvement. Passing is inevitable if you continue to improve.

Mental Engines (mental management course)
Organize your emotions and deal with the mental barriers of bar preparation, to go from overwhelmed to focused, unmotivated to productive, and anxious to calm.
If you enjoyed this, forward it to someone who would find this email helpful. Or just share this link anywhere you want.

If someone forwarded this to you, sign up to get your very own emails at www.makethisyourlasttime.com. Or join the MTYLT Facebook community, a private and supportive space to discuss the bar exam with others on this quest. Real profile required to keep it safe and exclusive to MTYLT readers and friends.
 
Make This Your Last Time
Closed group
Join the Community on Facebook
 
Follow my FB page for quick tips Follow my FB page for quick tips
More resources on the website More resources on the website
Copyright © 2019 Make This Your Last Time, All rights reserved.

You’re getting this email because you signed up to receive insights for bar prep at www.makethisyourlasttime.com or someone forwarded it to you.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe

My mailing address:
Brian Hahn
Make This Your Last Time
10645 Calle Mar de Mariposa #6409
San Diego, CA 92130

Add us to your address book


Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp