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Today in Repair


July 15, 2022
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India proposes right to repair framework to promote jobs, help consumers

The U.S. and EU are two of the largest economies in the world, and they have been the focus of much of the attention in the fight for a right to repair. But lately, the biggest progress has come from outside those two, huge markets. Notably: Australia and now India, where Right-to-repair legislation may soon be implemented following a recent announcement from the government. Initiated by the Department of Consumer Affairs (DoCA), a committee has been set up to design the framework of the new law. The government body has also clarified that the framework will not just be limited to smartphones. 

Multiple product segments like farming equipment, consumer durables and the products in the automobile industry will be included. (TechRadar)

Also read: 

BMW debuts heated seat and steering wheel subscriptions in the UK

BMW is bringing a heated seat subscription service to the UK. British drivers of the German luxury vehicles will be able to get access to a warm derriere for £15 and for an extra £10 they will be have warm hands on the steering wheel.

The features - which can be paid for monthly or up front - are able to be purchased from BMW’s ConnectedDrive e-retailer and operated remotely, cutting out the need to go to a dealer. A spokesperson for the manufacturer told BBC News that "where heated seats, or any feature available in the ConnectedDrive store have been purchased when a customer vehicle is ordered, no subsequent subscription or payment is necessary". (news-journal.com)
 
set to come up with 'Right To Repair' under the Statutory Framework of CCPA. Under new rules, consumers can't be forced to change or buy new products by manufacturer in return for faulty products/items.
 
set to come up with 'Right To Repair' under the Statutory Framework of CCPA. Under new rules, consumers can't be forced to change or buy new products by manufacturer in return for faulty products/items.
 
is set to come up with 'Right To Repair' under the Statutory Framework of CCPA. Under new rules, consumers can't be forced to change or buy new products by manufacturer in return for faulty products/items.
 
Read more at:
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/india/soon-you-wont-have-to-exchange-a-faulty-product-with-a-new-one-here-are-the-details/articleshow/92849597.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign= ..
 
set to come up with 'Right To Repair' under the Statutory Framework of CCPA. Under new rules, consumers can't be forced to change or buy new products by manufacturer in return for faulty products/items
 

On Wheelchair Repairs, Steering Clear of Error

As the CEO of National Seating & Mobility (NSM), I applaud the work of KHN in providing in-depth reporting about important issues in health care, including the complex rehabilitation technology (CRT) industry.

However, the recent article “Despite a First-Ever ‘Right-to-Repair’ Law, There’s No Easy Fix for Wheelchair Users” (June 2) presented several inaccuracies, misrepresentations, and errors in its characterization of NSM and our work. (Kaiser Health News)

The EU’s Common Charging Solution to Manage the E-Waste Crisis

The European Union came up with a proposition that could solve both problems of customer convenience and e-waste. In September 2021, the European Commission took a step in the direction of e-waste management by way of instituting a common charging solution for many portable electronic devices. Once enforced, all sorts of electronic devices, including mobile phones, tablets, e-readers, earphones, cameras, headsets, gaming consoles, speakers, health trackers, navigation devices, keyboards, and computer mice would all require the same type of charger – the USB-C. This move would significantly reduce the number of cables produced and sold. The EU has plans on extending this law from small and medium sized devices to bigger ones and include this policy in the sale of laptops two years after its application.  

The proposal is part of the Green Deal, a raft of new policies to meet the EU climate change goals of reducing 55% of emissions from 1990 levels by 2030, as well as a long-term goal of reaching net-zero emissions by 2050. (Earth.org)

How the Warranty Act can protect your right to repair | Better Business Bureau

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (“The Warranty Act”) prohibits a company from conditioning a product’s warranty on the customer’s use of any article or service identified by brand, trade, or corporate name.

Also known as “anti-tying” or “right to repair,” in simple terms it means the company can’t tell a customer the warranty will be voided if the customer uses a part made by someone else or has someone other than the dealer repair the product. 

There are two narrow exceptions to the rules – the company has received a waiver from the FTC in advance by proving that the product will only work properly if a specific branded part is used; or the warranty states that the company will provide the identified parts or service for free. Providing certain parts for free but voiding the warranty for using another manufacturer’s parts in other situations would still be a violation of the law. 
(Commercial Appeal)

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