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I am sharing exciting news today! Read about current monarch activity. Discover what milkweed plants in your area are doing as the weather changes.
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Monarch caterpillars are finishing their transformation into butterflies and the migration to winter sites is underway. This one is wearing a sombrero but will, in fact, be overwinter in California.

Have migrating monarch left your milkweed plants? 

Your milkweed may not see another monarch until the Spring. Be ready for them by sowing seeds now.

Thanksgiving is a great time for you to put milkweed seeds in the ground. They want to be outside all winter! You can leave the seeds in pots outside. They can be spread into a barren garden bed. If you save your milkweed seeds to plant in the Spring then you may discover, like I did, that the seeds are not ready to sprout. Cold stratification increases germination rates by nearly 90%. 

Asclepias curassavica or Tropical milkweed needs no cold stratification and is ready to germinate year round. This makes it a favorite among monarch farmers.

If your are currently growing milkweed then you may see it is wilted and appears to be dying. Don't fret. Milkweed goes dormant during the winter. It will grow back in the Spring and have leaves ready just in time for the return of the monarch migration in your area.

Where are the monarchs now?

In Mexico, Dia de los Muertos marks the arrival of monarchs to their overwintering sites. Currently, there are reports of monarchs arriving early. Read more about their early arrival in this article titled Mexico sees signs of hope for monarch butterflies as they arrive early.
In California, monarch welcome weekend was celebrated at Natural Bridges State Beach near Santa Cruz. Read more about the Welcome Back Monarchs Day at Natural Bridges State Beach on Sunday.

 

Milkweed has just finished producing seeds in most of the country. Milkweed seeds are spread in the wind. Lower Fall temperatures prompt seed pods to open.
Believe it or not the caterpillar in a sombrero above transformed into this monarch butterfly. Read all about raising a monarch in my blog here.
Copyright © 2014 Grow Milkweed Plants, All rights reserved.


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