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The fight against the coronavirus outbreak, handling A.I. with care, the dark side of wearables and more stories in this week's newsletter!

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There are many similarities between the current outbreak to the SARS one from its geolocation to its spread to the viruses themselves.

However, much has changed within the 17 year gap between those two pandemics. For one, technology in the healthcare sector has known an exponential boom. New technologies that were nonexistent or poorly developed in 2003 are now more affordable and widespread and can help manage and even prevent such cases. Let’s see how this can be the case.

A MAN DIAGNOSED WITH THE WUHAN CORONAVIRUS IS LARGELY TREATED BY A ROBOT


The first person diagnosed with the Wuhan coronavirus in the United States is being treated by a few medical workers and a robot. The robot, equipped with a stethoscope, is helping doctors take the man's vitals and communicate with him through a large screen, said Dr. George Diaz, chief of the infectious disease division at the Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington.

WHY IT'S IMPORTANT?

This is an interesting experiment to see whether such telemedical robots can help medical professionals remain healthy while examining and treating patients.

We put together the most popular books from The Medical Futurist to provide a clear picture about the major trends shaping the future of medicine and healthcare. Digital health technologies, artificial intelligence, the future of 20 medical specialties, big pharma and how technology giants such as Amazon or Google want to conquer healthcare in one ultimate package!

When artificial intelligence emerged, people imagined the A.I. revolution as robots killing humanity. Today, we are less afraid of robots taking our lives and more afraid of them taking our jobs - medical professionals and nurses included.

At The Medical Futurist, we’re great fans of wearables (or health trackers) that help you make more informed decisions when it comes to your health. However, we can’t stay indifferent to the potential risks which using these devices entail such as individual tracking, inaccuracies and even supplementing harmful behaviours.

If you were oblivious about the flip side of the health-tracking industry, then join us as we explore the lesser-known, darker side of wearables.

WHY IT'S IMPORTANT?

The health tracker industry must address issues from privacy and addiction to cybersecurity.

These days, it might seem like algorithms are out-diagnosing doctors at every turn, identifying dangerous lesions and dodgy moles with the unerring consistency only a machine can muster. Just this month, Google generated a wave of headlines with a study showing that its AI systems can spot breast cancer in mammograms more accurately than doctors.

WHY IT'S IMPORTANT?

A.I. algorithms have to address real clinical questions before getting mainstream in the medical practice.

London-headquartered company Babylon has announced a 10-year partnership with the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust (RWT) in the West Midlands to launch a model of ‘digital-first integrated care’.

WHY IT'S IMPORTANT?

Babylon Health will get access to huge amounts of health data which is a huge advantage over other companies.

For many years, the biggest players in big data in healthcare were hospitals and insurers. Electronic health records (EHRs) harbor data of great value to research and clinical practice. And in the USA alone, there are more than 900 insurance companies offering medical coverage, all of which hold reams of real-world health-related claims data. But data can also be sourced from less likely places such as mobile phones, tablets and wearables.

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© The Medical Futurist 2019 






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