Copy
Sakura Tea - Spring in your cup
View this email in your browser
Tea Info Shelf
After the dormant period in winter, tea farmers are back to the tea fields. There are some preparation works to be done before the spring harvesting begins in May. Even through the cold period, tea trees keep growing slowly. They need to be trimmed to a more manageable shape, that will also encourage more energetic new growth. Trimming work usually take place in March.

In Kyoto, tea leaves trimmed in March are sometimes used to make a unique regional tea - Kyobancha, that is exceptionally light and smooth. At other times trimmed tea leaves are left in the tea fields to return the nutrients back to the soil. Covering soil with trimmed tea leaves is also a great way to prevent the appearance of weeds, that struggle to growth without sufficient sunlight. That is especially important for recently planted tea fields (as in the photo above), where young tea trees could easily be overwhelmed by weeds, without proper care.

While tea harvesting is the main activity though the warm period, there are a lot of maintenance works in the resting period too.
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Tea of the Month
Sweet Sakura Tea
Light and silky, this Sakura Tea has a sweet taste with notes of strawberry. It is beautifully pink in a cup with a lingering floral aroma.  This tea is made from cherry blossoms preserved in sugar. While its salty version is more common in Japan, this tea offers one of the sweetest and most beautiful Japanese experiences.
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Sakura Tea
Light and smooth, this Sakura Tea is mildly salty with a floral aftertaste and undertones of plum. Transparent pink in a cup it has pleasant floral aroma with subtle hints of seawater. This tea is made from cherry blossoms preserved by salt and plum vinegar. Its slightly salty taste is common in Japan, as the tea itself is used for celebrations and special occasions.
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Tencha
Medium heavy in body with a rounded quality, Tencha is rich in umami with underlying notes of zucchini and peach. Its light torques-tinted color is accompanied by a pleasant herbal aroma with hints of parsley. Shaded for a month and usually ground to drinking grade Matcha, Tencha in leaf form is fairly rare.
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
What's New? - Sweet Sakura Tea

With a blooming spring, Obubu brings you Sweet Sakura Tea. Sakura Tea is a uniquely Japanese drink, that is often used for weddings and other celebrations. Traditionally Sakura Tea is made by preserving it in salt and plum vinegar.  This way, while beautifully floral, it keeps some salty notes in its taste. To accentuate its floral flavors more, Obubu has accepted the challenge to create Sweet Sakura Tea preserved in sugar, that is now ready for your evaluation. Preservation in sugar is a little more difficult than in salt, so we are currently releasing Sweet Sakura Tea in small size packages for you to try until we have it available in larger sizes. Wouldn`t you want to welcome spring in your cup?
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Meet Obubu's Friends - Jennifer

Who are you and what do you do? I am Jennifer Urbina, from California. I am a lead grower for Cuyamaca College Nursery and Production Manager for a Tillandsia (air plant) wholesale nursery.  My work consists of everyday exposure to plants of all climates. Not only do I have two jobs, I am also on my last year as a horticulture student. After graduation I intend to concentrate in growing my tea business, Té de Senelpia, founded January 2015!
How did you get to know Obubu? I learned more about Obubu when I lived on the farm house, immersing myself in the tea fields, culture, tastings, tours, and most importantly, with all the amazing international house mates! The Japanese staff also taught me about the marketing/ business side of Obubu, which I am grateful for. 
What is Obubu to you? Earth-based, farm raised tea leaves, freshly grown, and authentically made tea is what Obubu is to me. Great friends, tea family, good food, beautiful memories, and good-spirited Wazukan people define Obubu.
What is your favorite way to make tea? Making tea in the presence of people I love is my favourite way to make tea. I simply enjoy preparing tea for all who seek to learn which is why steeping tea in my kyusu or yixing pot keeps my practice consistent. 
What message would you like to pass to Obubu readers and friends? It is up to all of us to teach everyone the culture and art of tea, for it is surfacing again in this new century. Obubu is always seeking ways to expose delicious tea across the world, but we all can help in globalizing tea by teaching everyone the true essence of tea in all forms from leaves to cup.  Blissful sipping!  
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Events of the Past Month - Tea Seminar in Kawane

Obubu, was invited to present at tea conference in a famous tea producing town - Kawane, Shizuoka. With a decreasing interest in Japanese tea domestically, many tea farmers are starting to get curious about the possibilities abroad. Our team went to share our international experience, from tea sales to providing educational and cultural experience. Kawane tea farmers were genuinely curious and greeted us with many questions. In exchange we too got to learn about some more advanced Kawane tea farming and processing practices. Sharing and learning together is what Obubu is all about.
Like Obubu Tea - March on Facebook share on Twitter
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
YouTube
YouTube
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Website
Website
Email
Email
Copyright © 2015 Obubu Tea, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp