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New Website Design & Fresh Spring Tea
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Tea Info Shelf
In the last edition we talked about how tea was harvested traditionally. As the second harvest of the year is about to start let's see what is happening today. 

Nowadays tea is mostly harvested with a machine, that trims the top of the tea bush and blows the cut leaves into a long bag attached to it. The first generation of tea harvesting machine was just a big pair of hedge scissors with an attached bag. A two men held harvesting machine followed next and has remained the most common today. The newest advancement is a driven machine that harvests tea while riding over the row of the tea bushes (it only works on flat landscapes, though).

Compared to harvesting by hand, machine harvesting is much more economical and productive. With a man held machine you only need two people to harvest a tea field, and the newest driven harvesting machine can be handled by just one person. In addition to that, the amount of tea harvested in a day differs too. While professional tea pickers can collect 20-30kg of tea per day, harvesting with a men held machine results in 500-600kg of raw tea leaves during the same amount of time.

While there may be some arguable flavor differences between hand- and machine-harvested tea, harvesting machine is what we need to thank to for the the beautiful and unique Japanese tea scenery.

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Tea of the Month - Shincha (a.k.a. fresh tea)
Kabuse Sencha
Rich and intense, Kabuse Sencha has a lasting umami taste with notes of asparagus and melon. Jade-green in color it has a grassy aroma with subtle hints of clover. Shaded from the sun for two weeks and harvested in spring, Kabuse Sencha is the highest grade tea available.
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Sencha of the Wind
Rich and rounded, Wind boasts natural sweetness with underlying elements of banana and chestnut. When brewed it brings moss-like green into a cup and offers notable aroma of willow bark. Shaded from the sun and made form a traditional Zairai cultivar, Wind is mellower than the rest.
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What's New? - New Website Design

Long-awaited Obubu website has a new look! To better convey our philosophy and values as well as for you to have a more enjoyable virtual experience with us, the design changes were brought about by Kevin, our very own intern. So what has changed? Faster servers, clearer website navigation and more engaging design. Have a look and let us know what you think.
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Meet Obubu's Friends - Sarah

Who are you and what do you do? Hello, I’m Sarah and my photo shows my tea journey in teacups. The little one with the rabbit is from my first tea set, although I was rarely allowed to make real tea in it and had to substitute water in the teapot and orange cordial in the milk jug. My earliest tea drinking memories are from when we were staying with my grandparents, granddad brought everyone (including 3 year old me!) a cup of tea in bed in the mornings. I have fond memories of the sound of rattling cups and saucers as granddad made his way upstairs with the tray. My taste then was for sweet milky black tea.

I continued with “Irish style” black tea (not unlike English Breakfast Tea) until college where I had a fling with coffee. The cup with the girl on it was a gift from a college friend when I started my first real job. It says “coffee being” under the girl.

A few years later I went to my first antique fair and bought a tea set, the pink cup is from it. Around that time I found out there was more than one kind of tea and had started trying out different teas on my travels in Europe. My favourite around this time was Lady Grey. 

My separate interests in tea and Japanese culture finally crossed paths in a Japanese Restaurant in Dublin where I tasted my first Japanese tea. I got to visit Japan in 2013, and bought some Japanese tea cups in Kyoto to serve my Obubu in when I came home. The last cup is my favourite cup to drink my favourite tea from, Obubu of course. I think I’ve found my forever favourite <3
How did you get to know Obubu? It was a long held wish to visit Japan, when I finally got to go I researched everything I wanted to see and do before I went and I found Obubu.
What is Obubu to you? I had always wanted to visit a tea farm and Obubu opening up their farm to visitors allowed that dream come true. I think I spent the whole day stunned that I was actually there! I was treated like an honoured guest and that day remains a highlight of my trip. It’s not just a memory though as I was delighted to find I could have tea sent to me from Obubu. Now like magic that package of Obubu Tea arrives and I can enjoy my Japanese tea and know exactly where it came from. I love having that connection.
What is your favorite way to make tea? My favourite way is to make a pot of warm tea and drink it unhurried. When I have finished with the tea leaves, I pour more water over them into the teapot, and then use it to water my plants, they love it!
What message would you like to pass to Obubu readers and friends? Just to send warm greetings to everyone in the Obubu “Tea Family” from Ireland.
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Events of the Past Month - Spring Sencha Picking for the National Tea Competition

Every May Obubu invites community to help us make tea for the National Tea Competition. This year grumpy weather did not scare us and more than 120 people, out of who about 20 from abroad, chose a morning on a tea farm in Wazuka. In a few hours the goal was reached and we had 30kg of fresh tea leaves. While the competition results will only be announced in autumn, with such a beautiful community of tea lovers from all around the world we feel we have won something already. Maybe you can come join us next year?
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