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Beth Boles of Lamoine was named “Miss Hancock County GOP” at the Blue Hill Fair on Labor Day 1972.
Hello Bulletinbuzzers: It's Thursday, May 13. Are you a restaurant/deli/food truck owner, struggling to make ends meet? Here's an idea: go public. It worked pretty well for Hometown International, Inc.,a company that is entirely made up of one deli in New Jersey, Your Hometown Deli. The company does roughly $80 per day in sales, and was valued last month at - wait for it - two billion dollars.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (S.E.C.) was totally on top of things though, so don't worry. "When Hometown submitted its I.P.O. paperwork, the S.E.C. warned, 'Please revise your disclosure throughout your filing to state that you are a shell company.' Hometown took exception to this. Shell companies don’t actually do business. Hometown, on the other hand, was procuring meats and sprucing up its storefront. 'Various sinks and tables were purchased,' Hometown responded. 'There is also a cable phone line available to use.' The I.P.O. went ahead. Revenue declined. The stock price did not."
 
In the weather: Beautiful and warm, with highs in the mid-60s, and some "pop-up" showers possible.

High tide on the Union River is at 12:52 p.m.; low tide is at 6:50 p.m.
Local firefighters and law enforcement gathered Friday morning to escort the body of Ellsworth Deputy Fire Chief Bobby Dorr from Jordan-Fernald Funeral Home in Ellsworth to Mount Hope in Bangor. The motorcade for Dorr, who died of cancer May 5, started at 8:45 a.m. A public memorial service will be held Sunday, May 16, at Ellsworth Elementary-Middle School starting at 1 p.m.

AMERICAN AQUAFARMS’ DISCHARGE ESTIMATES SPARK QUESTIONS

Hancock County residents late last week got an abstract picture of how American Aquafarms would draw and discharge sea water and dispose of waste from its proposed operation in Frenchman Bay. But when citizens asked, the Norwegian-backed company failed to specify by whom and exactly where in the world the closed-pen technology is being used in real time commercially to grow and successfully harvest Atlantic salmon for the global market. “Are your numbers essentially best guesses? Why can’t you move your pens offshore?” Ben Walter asked. “It seems you are experimenting with the bay and the lives in our community.”


CASTINE VOTERS APPROVE NAME CHANGE FOR NEGRO ISLANDS

Upper and Lower Negro Islands will be no more. Eventually. Voters at Castine’s annual Town Meeting Saturday approved initiating the process of changing the names in a split vote. Town Manager Shawn Blodgett said "the result was 44-33 in favor of changing the names" of the two islands. Upper Negro Island is privately owned while Lower Negro Island is owned by Maine Coast Heritage Trust.

 PHOTO COURTESY OF LORI KOGUT
MAN WHO STRUCK AND KILLED PEDESTRIAN IN CROSSWALK WILL NOT FACE CRIMINAL CHARGES

The man who struck and killed McKenna Unobskey in a crosswalk near The Jackson Laboratory in December will not face criminal charges, according to the District Attorney’s Office. Unobskey, a 27-year-old animal care supervisor at the lab, was in the crosswalk on Route 3 at about 5:47 a.m. when Russell Clark struck her with his Jeep. She was pronounced dead at the scene. After an investigation by Bar Harbor Police, District Attorney Matt Foster decided to not go forward with charges against Clark because the evidence did not rise to the level of criminal culpability. 


NEW DEER ISLE-STONINGTON HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL STARTING IN JULY

The new Deer Isle-Stonington High School principal will move to the island in June after having handled discipline for a Nashville, Tenn., middle school of 900-plus students whose families spoke about 40 different languages. Laura Davis, a Nashville native, starts July 1 and replaces current Principal Dennis Duquette, who is leaving to explore other options.

PHOTO COURTESY NORTHERN LIGHT HEALTH

VACCINE EUPHORIA AND VACCINE RELUCTANCE: WHO’S GETTING THE SHOT?

Get your shot, take a selfie, post it on social media. How many of these photos have we scrolled through in recent weeks? For many Hancock County residents, receiving a vaccine is more than a COVID-19 rite of passage. It’s the road to freedom. That is what Johanna-Karen Johannson said. Recently retired as priest at St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church, the Bucksport resident said she made an appointment as soon as she was eligible. “I am 71 years old, and I want to live a long, full life,” Johannson said. And despite a strong reaction to her second Moderna shot, once she recovered, “there was just a new sense of freedom,” she said. “I could go places. And [I felt] a certain satisfaction that I’d done the right thing for myself and the people around me.” 


GOULDSBORO SEEKS NEW POLICE CHIEF

The police chief’s position is to be advertised this week and the search launched for the successor of John Shively, who abruptly resigned May 4. In his resignation letter, Shively blamed a series of unfounded complaints against him including a recent one that resulted in him taking and passing a polygraph test. He also took issue with the fact that those same allegations since have been reported to the Hancock County District Attorney’s Office.


WINTER HARBOR LOBSTER FESTIVAL A NO-GO, BUT FIREWORKS AND BOAT RACES WILL HAPPEN

For the second year in a row, the Winter Harbor Lobster Festival will not officially happen in August due to the ongoing pandemic, but tourists and townspeople will still be able to enjoy the annual lobster boat races and fireworks. Those two activities “have always been separate and independent” of the town-sanctioned festival, Town Manager Cathy Carruthers explained. The races and fireworks are sponsored by D.C. Air & Seafood, which is owned by Selectman Christopher Byers.  The unanimous decision to not officially hold the festival was made following discussion at the Board of Selectmen’s May 10 meeting. 

“TIMING IS PERFECT” FOR SENIOR PLAYGROUND AT KNOWLTON PARK

A work crew broke ground on the Knowlton Park Senior Fitness Playground on April 29, following five years of planning and fundraising by Friends in Action. Two years into the project, the city’s Planning Department came on board. “We’re really, really thrilled,” Friends in Action Executive Director Jo Cooper said. “The timing is perfect.” Friends in Action is an Ellsworth-based nonprofit organization that supports seniors and people with disabilities across Hancock County with programs, services and activities.


ELLSWORTH HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION PLANS FINALIZED

In a return to a more traditional graduation, Ellsworth High School seniors will gather with family and friends at 6 p.m. on June 11 at Del Luce Stadium. The outdoor setting is a nod to COVID-19 restrictions and fears but allows seniors to invite up to eight people to attend. The rain date is June 12 at 6 p.m. And the success of last year’s car parade, held so the community could honor graduates in a pandemic year, will be carried over on Class Night on June 3, with two tickets issued to each graduating senior for family to join. The School Board heard final graduation and prom plans on May 11 and fully approved.

PHOTO COURTESY BERT YANKIELUN

DETECTORIST BERT YANKIELUN, “DR. WHY,” DIGS UP DEER ISLE HISTORY

Come spring, Mariners Memorial Park is prime butterfly-watching territory: you might catch the pale blue wings of the spring azure, which is partial to the dogwoods that dot the preserve, or the tiger swallowtail, which prefers the nectar from pink and red flowers. You might also, if you’re lucky, catch a glimpse of Dr. Bert Yankielun, Antarctic adventurer, author, engineer, inventor and snow shelter expert, sweeping the ground with his metal detector and waiting for the “beeps and boops” of discovery. “People call it dirt fishing. There are days when you’ll find incredible things and there days when you find nothing.”

ELLSWORTH BASEBALL, SOFTBALL TEAMS BEAT JOHN BAPST, HERMON

With the 2021 season nearing the midway point, the Ellsworth baseball and softball teams are getting hot at the right time. Ellsworth cruised to wins on the baseball and softball diamonds last week with victories Wednesday against John Bapst and Saturday against Hermon. The wins were the products of strong all-around efforts from the Eagles, who kept opposing offenses at bay and produced runs consistently in some of their strongest showings this year.

Heard Around Town: The U.S. Postal Service’s contract letter carrier Annie Perry, whose mail route (HCR 35) takes her through Winter Harbor and various Gouldsboro villages, got a nice surprise nearly at the end in Corea. Opening up a box, she discovered homemade chocolate chip cookies and a handscrawled note, saying “A little snack for you honey.” Tracey Young Smith supplied the welcome treat. “I have the best customers,” summed up Annie
Going out? Wear your mask, wash your hands, keep your distance.

This afternoon, at 4 p.m. learn about bees with biologist Sara Bushmann, then play some online chess with the Blue Hill Chess Enthusiasts from 5 to 8 p.m. There are two great author talks on tap, both at 7 p.m., one featuring Laurie Apgar Chandler (“Through Woods and Waters: A Solo Journey to Maine’s New National Monument”) and Claire Ackroyd ("Murder in the Maple Woods) and the other with Kate Hotchkiss, who wrote "On Harbor's Edge." 

On Friday, May 14, grab some grub at the Franklin Veterans Club for $8, starting at 5 p.m.

On Saturday, help clean up the Schoodic Scenic Byway from 8 a.m. to noon in Sullivan, check out the Yellow Tulip Project HOPE Day Celebration at 10 a.m. at Knowlton Park in Ellsworth, or whittle a warbler at a bird carving workshop with Wendell Gilley Museum carver-in-residence Steve Valleau at the Schoodic Institute from 1 to 4 p.m.

As of Wednesday, each citizen’s share of the outstanding public debt was $84,882, up $63 from $84,819 last week. Students who attend school in Maine leave with an average student loan debt of $32,521.

Dad joke of the day: I'm afraid for the calendar. Its days are numbered.
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