This Week in Southeast Asian Studies (TWISEA)
May 8, 2015
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Section spotlight: Resources

Recommended articles and other resources 


Two weeks ago we launched a new section of this email dedicated to sharing news items and other recently published resources recommended by readers. Here's a recap:

New items: Items from last week:To submit an item for next week, email seac@uw.edu. You are also welcome to submit posts for the SEAC blog
 
In this issue
Events*
Resources*
Funding*
Conferences*
Study Abroad*

*Indicates new content this week

Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website
Upcoming Events (4)

Significance of the Minanga Sipakko Neolithic Site in West Sulawesi, Indonesia

Friday, May 8, 2:30-4:00 pm

UW Denny Hall, Room 401

A presentation by Dr. Truman Simanjuntak, National Research Center for Archaeology, Indonesia

Minanga Sipakko is the most important of the Neolithic sites along the Karama River, which flows from the Luwu and Toraja mountains to the Makassar Strait in West Sulawesi, Indonesia. Excavations have yielded a very rich artifact and ecofact assemblages in the occupation layers from about 3800-2500 BP. Early occupation layers are characterized by dense red-slipped pottery in association with small bone points, and a variety of lithic tools, while in the upper layer red-slipped pottery is replaced by plain and decorated pottery as well as low-fired coarse pottery. Adzes of different types made of schist were found all through the occupation layer. Other finds are grinding stone, pestle and mortar, flakes, ornaments, stone bark cloth beater, faunal and seed remains. This evidence shows that Minanga Sipakko is a Neolithic occupation site where early Austronesian-speaking people exploited various natural resources available in its surroundings, such as fauna and seeds for food, and rocks for tools.
Phytolith analysis on sediment reveals the presence of rice (*Oryza sp*.) besides palms, grasses, shrubs, trees, and bamboos.
 

Sponsored by: Mellon Foundation, College of Arts and Sciences, Jackson School of
International Studies, Quaternary Research Center, Science Studies Network,
Program on Climate Change, Southeast Asia Center, Simpson Center for the
Humanities


More details on the event page
See who's going on Facebook

The Ghosts of Tonkin

Friday-Sunday, May 8-10, 7:30 pm & 2:30 pm

ACT Theatre (700 Union Street)

Presented by: ACT Theatre and Bellingham TheatreWorks

It will topple the president of the United States. It will devastate two countries. It will kill two million people. And one man, Oregon's Senator Wayne Morse, will try to stop it before it begins. In commemoration of the 50-year anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin resolution, Bellingham TheatreWorks presents the powerful, behind-closed-doors story of how seemingly well-intentioned public officials brought about one of the most devastating chapters in the history of the United States: The Vietnam War. Play followed by post-play discussion featuring the playwright, Vietnam veterans, and community leaders. Post-play moderators include Dave Ross of KIRO radio, Manda Factor of KOMO radio, Florangela Davila of KPLU, Elisa Jaffe of KOMO 4, Allen Schauffler of Al Jazeera, and Ross Reynolds of KUOW. 

Read more and purchase tickets on the event webpage
See who's going on Facebook

Thailand: The Failure of Democracy - From Field Marshall Sarit Thanarat to General Prayut Chan-ocha

Wednesday, May 20, 3:30-5:00 pm

UW Thomson Hall, Room 317

A presentation by UW Professor Emeritus Charles Keyes, who writes:

In December 2014 and early January 2015 my wife, Jane, and I were in Thailand once again – perhaps concluding over a half-century of deep involvement with the country. That Thailand was once again under military rule as it had been when we first arrived in Thailand in August 1962 was distressing and saddening. The political history of Thailand from the late 1950s until today can be summarized as being from Field Marshal Sarit Thanarat, the military dictator from 1958 to 1963, to General Prayut Chan-ocha, the head of the military junta that seized power in May 2014. Both based their domination of the political order on the assumption that only military rule could ensure order and protect the institution of the monarchy. Thai society is not, however, the same in 2014-15 as it was in 1958-73 when Sarit and his chosen successors ruled the country. In this talk I reflect on why there has to date been a failure of democracy in Thailand and then examine the contemporary conditions that may finally make military dictatorship untenable, but perhaps also lead to more political turmoil in the kingdom of no longer smiling Thai.
 

Sponsored by the Southeast Asia Center


Event page
See who's going on Facebook

The Politics of Distant War: 1917, 1941, 1964

Thursday, May 21, 7:30-8:30 pm

UW Kane Hall, Room 200

A presentation by Mary L. Dudziak, Ph.D, J.D., a leading U.S. legal historian

Most Americans are insulated from the consequences of war, as wars are fought at a distance and military service is not a requirement of citizenship. This lecture by leading U.S. historian Mary L. Dudziak takes up the way distance has affected public engagement and presidential war power, arguing that distance mattered not only in the Vietnam War and after, but also during World Wars I and II.

Mary L. Dudziak is a leading U.S. legal historian. Her research is at the intersection of domestic law and U.S. international affairs, with a focus on war and political accountability in American history. Professor Dudziak is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and in fall 2015 she will be the Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance at the Library of Congress. She received her J.D. and Ph.D. from Yale University.

Sponsored by the Jackson School of International Studies and the Center for Global Studies


Event page
Other upcoming events:
Back to top
Recommended Resources
This section lists news items and other recently-published resources that have been recommended by faculty and grad students over the past week. To submit an item for next week, email seac@uw.edu.

New items: Items from last week;
Back to top
Fellowships and Funding

New this week:

For general information on funding sources, including FLAS, visit the SEAC website
Conferences and Calls for Papers

New this week:

 

Previously listed opportunities:

Study Abroad

New this week:

Previously listed opportunity:

Back to top
Copyright © 2015 Southeast Asia Center at the University of Washington, All rights reserved.


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This Week in Southeast Asian Studies (TWISEA)
May 8, 2015
View this email in your browser
Forward this email to a friend
Section spotlight: Resources

Recommended articles and other resources 


Two weeks ago we launched a new section of this email dedicated to sharing news items and other recently published resources recommended by readers. Here's a recap:

New items: Items from last week:To submit an item for next week, email seac@uw.edu. You are also welcome to submit posts for the SEAC blog
 
In this issue
Events*
Resources*
Funding*
Conferences*
Study Abroad*

*Indicates new content this week

Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website
Upcoming Events (4)

Significance of the Minanga Sipakko Neolithic Site in West Sulawesi, Indonesia

Friday, May 8, 2:30-4:00 pm

UW Denny Hall, Room 401

A presentation by Dr. Truman Simanjuntak, National Research Center for Archaeology, Indonesia

Minanga Sipakko is the most important of the Neolithic sites along the Karama River, which flows from the Luwu and Toraja mountains to the Makassar Strait in West Sulawesi, Indonesia. Excavations have yielded a very rich artifact and ecofact assemblages in the occupation layers from about 3800-2500 BP. Early occupation layers are characterized by dense red-slipped pottery in association with small bone points, and a variety of lithic tools, while in the upper layer red-slipped pottery is replaced by plain and decorated pottery as well as low-fired coarse pottery. Adzes of different types made of schist were found all through the occupation layer. Other finds are grinding stone, pestle and mortar, flakes, ornaments, stone bark cloth beater, faunal and seed remains. This evidence shows that Minanga Sipakko is a Neolithic occupation site where early Austronesian-speaking people exploited various natural resources available in its surroundings, such as fauna and seeds for food, and rocks for tools.
Phytolith analysis on sediment reveals the presence of rice (*Oryza sp*.) besides palms, grasses, shrubs, trees, and bamboos.
 

Sponsored by: Mellon Foundation, College of Arts and Sciences, Jackson School of
International Studies, Quaternary Research Center, Science Studies Network,
Program on Climate Change, Southeast Asia Center, Simpson Center for the
Humanities


More details on the event page
See who's going on Facebook

The Ghosts of Tonkin

Friday-Sunday, May 8-10, 7:30 pm & 2:30 pm

ACT Theatre (700 Union Street)

Presented by: ACT Theatre and Bellingham TheatreWorks

It will topple the president of the United States. It will devastate two countries. It will kill two million people. And one man, Oregon's Senator Wayne Morse, will try to stop it before it begins. In commemoration of the 50-year anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin resolution, Bellingham TheatreWorks presents the powerful, behind-closed-doors story of how seemingly well-intentioned public officials brought about one of the most devastating chapters in the history of the United States: The Vietnam War. Play followed by post-play discussion featuring the playwright, Vietnam veterans, and community leaders. Post-play moderators include Dave Ross of KIRO radio, Manda Factor of KOMO radio, Florangela Davila of KPLU, Elisa Jaffe of KOMO 4, Allen Schauffler of Al Jazeera, and Ross Reynolds of KUOW. 

Read more and purchase tickets on the event webpage
See who's going on Facebook

Thailand: The Failure of Democracy - From Field Marshall Sarit Thanarat to General Prayut Chan-ocha

Wednesday, May 20, 3:30-5:00 pm

UW Thomson Hall, Room 317

A presentation by UW Professor Emeritus Charles Keyes, who writes:

In December 2014 and early January 2015 my wife, Jane, and I were in Thailand once again – perhaps concluding over a half-century of deep involvement with the country. That Thailand was once again under military rule as it had been when we first arrived in Thailand in August 1962 was distressing and saddening. The political history of Thailand from the late 1950s until today can be summarized as being from Field Marshal Sarit Thanarat, the military dictator from 1958 to 1963, to General Prayut Chan-ocha, the head of the military junta that seized power in May 2014. Both based their domination of the political order on the assumption that only military rule could ensure order and protect the institution of the monarchy. Thai society is not, however, the same in 2014-15 as it was in 1958-73 when Sarit and his chosen successors ruled the country. In this talk I reflect on why there has to date been a failure of democracy in Thailand and then examine the contemporary conditions that may finally make military dictatorship untenable, but perhaps also lead to more political turmoil in the kingdom of no longer smiling Thai.
 

Sponsored by the Southeast Asia Center


Event page
See who's going on Facebook

The Politics of Distant War: 1917, 1941, 1964

Thursday, May 21, 7:30-8:30 pm

UW Kane Hall, Room 200

A presentation by Mary L. Dudziak, Ph.D, J.D., a leading U.S. legal historian

Most Americans are insulated from the consequences of war, as wars are fought at a distance and military service is not a requirement of citizenship. This lecture by leading U.S. historian Mary L. Dudziak takes up the way distance has affected public engagement and presidential war power, arguing that distance mattered not only in the Vietnam War and after, but also during World Wars I and II.

Mary L. Dudziak is a leading U.S. legal historian. Her research is at the intersection of domestic law and U.S. international affairs, with a focus on war and political accountability in American history. Professor Dudziak is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and in fall 2015 she will be the Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance at the Library of Congress. She received her J.D. and Ph.D. from Yale University.

Sponsored by the Jackson School of International Studies and the Center for Global Studies


Event page
Other upcoming events:
Back to top
Recommended Resources
This section lists news items and other recently-published resources that have been recommended by faculty and grad students over the past week. To submit an item for next week, email seac@uw.edu.

New items: Items from last week;
Back to top
Fellowships and Funding

New this week:

For general information on funding sources, including FLAS, visit the SEAC website
Conferences and Calls for Papers

New this week:

 

Previously listed opportunities:

Study Abroad

New this week:

Previously listed opportunity:

Back to top
Copyright © 2015 Southeast Asia Center at the University of Washington, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

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