Copy
BACAPH newsletter
View this email in your browser

 
BACAPH is you, me, and all of us
working together for child health!
 
Welcome to our April newsletter.
 
BACAPH has been hard at work since we last spoke. We are actively looking for new members to contribute to the agenda of promoting child and adolescent public health. Membership is open to all professionals who work with children and young people. We actively seek members from all 4 nations of the UK.
Join us: £25.00 per year. http://www.bacaph.org.uk/index.php/membership
We want to hear from you: contact us at info@bacaph.org.uk or follow us on twitter @BACAPH
 
Meet with Us
 
BACAPH session at the RCPCH joint with the RCN annual Conference 27th April 2016 – exciting programme with notable speakers. Book now for the UKs largest annual conference of paediatrics and child health http://www.rcpch.ac.uk/annual-conference/annual-conference-2016
BACAPH session at the FPH annual conference – another exciting session focusing on the priorities for children and adolescents http://www.fph.org.uk/fph_annual_conference_and_public_health_exhibition_2016
BACAPH at the BACCH conference – ASM to be held on 15-16 September 2016 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Newcastle. We will be there; will you?
 
BACAPH Publications
 
Life Course frameworks – Here Dr. Simon Lenton illustrates the application of Public Health methodology to key health problems. By considering the interaction between positive (beneficial) and negative (harmful) factors relating to the host (experiencing the problem), the agent (causing the problem) and the environment relevant to the creation of a disease or condition; we can arrive at an evidence-based framework on which to base commissioning of health services.http://www.bacaph.org.uk/index.php/resources/bacaph-publications
View our website for worked examples. You too can use this methodology for your local projects.

Want to get involved? – contact us info@bacaph.org.uk
 
New blogs
 
1-Where is Aneurin Bevan Now?
Summary – blog outlining key aspects of the parliamentary report produced by the All Party Parliamentary Group looking at the effects of the Welfare Reform  and Work Bill on children. Read the blog by BACAPH Co-Chair Ingrid Wolfe here: http://www.bacaph.org.uk/index.php/blog/32-blog/287-blog-item1-33
Access the report here:  http://www.fph.org.uk/inquiry:_child_poverty_and_health_%E2%80%93_the_impact_of_the_welfare_reform_and_work_bill_2015-2016
The report above is essentially in synchrony with the recently published AAP policy on child poverty available here http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/03/07/peds.2016-0339  and the "technical report", which summarises the evidence on which the policy statement was based: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/03/07/peds.2016-0340.

2-What about migrant/refugee children? What part do we play in improving their health outcomes?
This blog containing links to available resources, references and guides relating to the provision of health services to refugee and asylum-seeking children and young people in the UK. The blog summarises issues related to the commissioning of services for this vulnerable group as well as considerations needed for the individual child.

Survey results

Thank you for completing our survey – Results available here: www.bacaph.org.uk
Members were asked to prioritise options in three areas (accepting the overlap between 1 and 2):
  1. clinical priorities
  2. determinant priorities
  3. priority criteria
 
The ranked results are presented with highest priority first.
Table 1: Clinical priorities   Table 2: Determinant priorities
  1. Early years interventions
 
  1. Understanding and reducing inequalities
  1. Nutrition/healthy weight
 
  1. Tackling social determinants
  1. Child and adolescent mental health
 
  1. Lifestyles, parenting and child health
  1. Improving perinatal outcomes
 
  1. Poverty
  1. Long term conditions
 
  1. Sustainable development
  1. Injury prevention
 
  1. Environmental issues
 
Additional suggestions included parenting, Vitamin D, Public Health approaches for school aged children.
The clinical priorities reflect the general themes of intervening early, effective interventions to prevent long-term morbidity; the determinant priorities reflect the importance of tackling poverty and inequalities and prioritising high risk groups using whole population approaches
Interested in working to promote child and adolescent public health?– contact us info@bacaph.org.uk

Other News
 
Grants for increasing access to water http://sustainablefoodtrust.org/articles/water-sugar-tax/?utm_source=SFT+Newsletter&utm_campaign=f632f88cea-Newsletter_07_10_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bf20bccf24-f632f88cea-105107845

PHE publication of child Health Profiles 2016 including interactive versions available on the PHE Fingertips tool www.chimat.org.uk/profiles

Next issue:
  1. Updates to our resources pages
  2. Achieving curriculum competencies - Trainees involvement with BACAPH
  3. Feedback from our session at the RCPCH conference
  4. Much more ...
 
 
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Copyright © 2016
BACAPH , All rights reserved.





unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

 






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
BACAPH · 5-11 Theobalds Road · London, WC1X 8SH · United Kingdom

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp