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MWP 2016 Winter Newsletter
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2016
Winter
Newsletter

Call for Nominations to
MWP's Executive Committee

Each year, in April, we hold elections to fill vacancies for the MWP Executive Committee (EC), with the new terms beginning in May. We currently have seven vacancies for regular members and one vacancy for a student member. If you would like to run for one of these positions, please submit your name to our administrator, Susan Johnson (mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com). Also, feel free to nominate another member and we'll contact her to confirm her interest.

The EC meets the second Monday of each month, from 7:00-9:00 PM. Members are asked to commit to a three year term, which involves attending the meetings and joining one of the subcommittees. These subcommittees meet during the scheduled EC meetings. Additional time commitment depends on the activities with which you volunteer to help.

Participation in the EC is a great networking opportunity. In addition to connecting to other members on the EC and subcommittees, we welcome your input and creative insights in planning the many events MWP offers (Let's face it -- It's your chance to add your two cents!). For more information and questions, please contact current Chair, Susan Whalen (whalen.susan@comcast.net).

**And a personal note from Susan Whalen: I've gotten to know SO many fun (and funny), very interesting women over the last four years on the EC. MWP is one of the very few organizations that focuses on 'Network and Support.' What I have been reminded of in my participation is that even though we're all very unique in our own ways, what we have in common is that we are a very strong and independent group of women who are truly interested in helping each other. Thank you, MWP, for this wonderful sense of Sisterhood!
 

by Susan Whalen, LICSW, MWP Executive Committee Chair

Upcoming MWP Specialization Workshop


Minnesota Women in Psychology is all about networking. Right?

Well, it’s more than that, but networking is a big part of our purpose.

And the purpose of networking is to get to know each other and learn about each other’s practice.

That’s why MWP is hosting another Specialization Workshop this spring.

This is an opportunity to meet therapists with different specialties and to learn what it took for them to become specialists in their area of expertise.

It is also an opportunity to be identified as having a specialty.

To those of us without a specialty, it seems easier to get referrals from insurance companies and other therapists if you have a specialty.

Last year’s topics included sex therapy, DBT, addiction, mindfulness, reproductive health, play therapy and couples.

If you have a specialty not yet covered, we would like to hear from you.

Last year about 30 students and therapists attended. There were six tables set up with a sign on each identifying a specialty. This year we will follow the same format with one speaker for each specialty. After about 20 minutes of presentation and discussion at each table, a bell rings and we scatter to our next choice of specialty. Attendees get to hear from three different specialists. Specialists present twice and then get to listen to a presentation at another table. It might sound chaotic, but it works very well.

Stay tuned to the eBlast for further information on the date and time.

Whether you would like to listen or present, I hope you can join us for a relaxed, fun and educational evening.
 
by Miriam Zachary, M.A., LMFT

Membership Engagement!


Want to get just a little bit more engaged with MWP?

Here’s your chance!

Help us pair members who have volunteered their help to current MWP projects.

As Volunteer Coordinator, you would call interested members when MWP committees are looking for specific help. This position is anticipated to take a couple hours/month at most, and does not involve any cold calls.

Help us better use the help we have -- our amazing volunteer members!

by Jennifer Fallon, Ph.D., LP
on behalf of the Executive Committee

What YOU Can Do:
The First Steps in
Making Invisible Illness Visible


What did you think about when you woke up this morning? Maybe it was the meeting you needed to get to by 8:00 AM. Maybe you still needed to pack a lunch for your child, or remember to make that haircut appointment for Wednesday. Maybe it was the laundry you hadn’t folded yet or your dinner plans. Tonight you will probably be exhausted after everything is checked off of your list, and like most Americans you will probably need your coffee in the morning to do it all over again tomorrow.
 
Now, what would happen if I asked you to think about all of the “little” things that you do on a daily basis as well? You do many of them. For example: brushing your teeth, showering, putting your shoes on, going to the bathroom, etc. What if every day your morning started with a list that included every single motion that a human does and conscious decisions about which things you could do physically? People with chronic illnesses and/or disabilities choose a fraction of life’s daily duties to accomplish, no matter how much is on their list. This is their reality.

Most of us have an idea of what someone with a disability or chronic illness looks like. We’ve seen people in wheelchairs, we have visited hospitals and have held a door for someone who looked like they needed help. Many people in my circle would be shocked to know that I deal with a chronic illness. Why would they be shocked? Because I don’t look sick. In fact, most people would look at me and guess that I am very healthy.
I have an invisible illness. Millions of other people have one too. And you may be surprised at how many of them you know personally. Every day when a person with an invisible illness gets out of bed (if they do get out of bed) they are often in pain, and cannot perform activities that most of their friends do without thinking. People with an invisible illness may take medications that give them unpleasant side effects, and they may be terrified about their future.

The majority of people who deal with a chronic health issue experience a mix of the above and more. Many are judged unfairly when they cannot work. They may be seen as lazy or a “whiner.” They may constantly feel as though they need to explain themselves, and many times they experience stress in their relationships. A person with an invisible illness may go through many medical professionals before finding one who believes they are dealing with a legitimate health problem.

Over the past eight years, I have worked with people experiencing different chronic illnesses who have been suffering in silence. In group settings, I have met people dealing with Lupus, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, heart conditions, rheumatoid and neurological conditions, cancer, digestive diseases, mental illness and many others. People are surprised to hear that only a small fraction of those participating in the many groups I have facilitated over the years have actually looked sick. In fact, according to the 2002 Census, (What? The US Census would have been 2000. What census is she talking about?) approximately 96% of people who live with an illness have an illness that is invisible.
So what can we all do? 
  1. When you see a person who looks healthy park in a handicap spot, or use the designated stall in the bathroom, remember that millions of people who deal with chronic conditions do not show signs of illness externally.
     
  2. Talk about it. If you find out your friend or loved one has a chronic illness, [it is okay to] learn about it. It is okay to ask respectful questions. And when you are talking to them, remember that they are still the same person [that] they were yesterday. The illness is just one part of their life.
     
  3. Know that you cannot fix their illness and you are not their doctor. Most people with chronic illnesses already have a medical team and care plan. It is nice for them to hear loved ones say, “Wow, that stinks!” “Always here for you!” “You’re doing awesome and I love you no matter what.”
     
  4. Do your best to remember that your friend with an invisible illness has an illness. That is why they may not be able to go on that road trip with you, or have that drink with you at the bar.
     
  5. Do not compare them to your sister’s boyfriend’s cousin who had the “same” illness. They are on their own journey and illnesses affect people in different ways.
     
  6. Educate yourself on their condition and read The Spoon Theory, by Christine Miserandino (link below)!
     
  7. Have their back and recognize that “small” accomplishments may in fact be big accomplishments.
For those with any type of chronic illness, The Spoon Theory by Christine Miserandino is a great place to start when attempting to have a conversation with loved ones about what it is like to live with a chronic condition: http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/

Cashman Center (Burnsville) offers a therapy group for those with chronic illnesses/disabilities. Please call 952.715.6451 for more information.

by Felixia M. Valerius, M.A.

Thoughts on Self-Care

 
There are a variety of reasons to practice self-care. I believe that when we care for ourselves, we offer better care to our clients. By centering our minds, offering our bodies peace and comfort, and nurturing ourselves, the impact of our presence becomes distinctive from the world around us. In our field of work, we are constantly giving. This can be draining or overwhelming. Carving out opportunities to care for ourselves may help us thrive rather than just get by. It also may stave off burnout. Last, but not least, it can help us maintain our own mental health by decreasing the cumulative impact of stress that each of us faces both during our workdays and in the hours between them. Furthermore, we can teach our clients to engage in their own self-care practices.
 
For this MWP Winter Newsletter, I asked members of our Executive Committee (EC) to share about self-care. I gave the EC the following prompt: If you could share just one tip about self-care, what would it be? (This can be for yourself as a therapist, or a tip you commonly give to clients). Here are their responses:
 
“Massage!”
-Leslie Root, M.A., LMFT
 
“I just found this great website and smartphone app for calming meditation: www.calm.com. The app provides a selection of 25 gorgeous nature scenes with life-like sounds and you can program your meditation to last for 2 - 20 minutes. Such an easy, relaxing and enjoyable way to let go of time and focus on calm breath.”
-Deb Rich PhD, LP, CPLC, of Shoshana Center for Reproductive Health Psychology
 
“Practice, practice, practice mindfulness! I love using the Hoberman sphere toy to visualize deep breathing, reading Guided Imagery for Groups by Andrew E. Schwartz, or taking time to myself to use an adult coloring book.”
-Hanin Ailabouni, M.S.Ed., LPC, NCC
Vice Chair of MWP
 
“First, I believe in and respect (and remind myself of) my client's right to self- determination. I am committed to do the best I can to be present with them and to work with them as effectively as I can. It is not my role to rescue them. At the end of the day, they go to their home and I go to mine.
Second, find something outside of the therapy world that you love and enjoy, and that you do for yourself. For me, it is singing in choir. My Wednesday nights are my choir nights and work isn't allowed to impinge on that time. The point is, keep some time for yourself, for something you love, for fun.”
-Laurie Nelson, LICSW
 
“I encourage simply walking.  Take that time just for yourself and walk, preferably outside, where there's little or no traffic around you. Focus on gratitude.
And remember to laugh!”
-Susan Whalen, LICSW
Chair of MWP
 
“I have no shame in admitting that one of the ways I relax is by watching television. I like to find a good series and get involved and lost in other people's lives. I also like to plan monthly dinners with good friends. I encourage clients, especially those going through tough times, or those that are caretakers, to try and put something enjoyable on their calendar every day, small or large, so they always take time for self-care and have a little something to look forward to each day.”
-Beth Johnson, LAMFT
 
“I set aside one night each week that is always 100% to myself. I usually do this on Thursdays when I see most of my clients with PTSD. It’s the perfect way to decompress from a long week and a very heavy day.”
-Beth Siegel, M.A.
 
“I try to do what I suggest to clients: walking, yoga, connecting with friends and learning to meditate. I am far from accomplished in the latter, but I believe it is worthwhile. I also listen to books during the 30 min. drive home from my office to get my mind off stories I have just heard.
Thinking about this question has made me realize I use a cue word therapy with my clients that I also use on myself. In fact, now that I think about it, maybe I could teach it to others as part of the Spotlight series. It’s a handy tool to have in one’s emotional protection arsenal.”
-Miriam Zachary, M.A., LMFT
 
“Food. I like what Michael Pollan said: Eat Food. Not Too Much. Mostly Plants. I aim to eat real, whole foods. I also try to keep my intake of added sugars low.”
-Farren Swanson, MA, LMFT
Newsletter Editor
 
Do you have a self-care practice? What kinds of things keep you fueled on a daily or weekly basis? Please share your thoughts with me at: newsletter.mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com
 
Compiled by Farren Swanson, MA, LMFT
Newsletter Editor

MWP Spotlight Series:
Network and Learn on the Go


Each year new members who join MWP ask: what is a Brown Bag? Since Brown Bag is not descriptive, we have decided to change the name to MWP Spotlight Series: Network and Learn on the Go. Consider how you could spotlight your practice. Do you have a specialty you would like us to understand better so we know how to refer to you? Do you have a particular clientele with whom you like to work? Do you have new furniture you want to show off? Do you just like to spend time with other therapists in a relaxed atmosphere?

How does it work? No presentation or food is required. Attendees will bring their own if they think they will be hungry or thirsty. You simply email me your idea with a suggested time and date for the spotlight. I will keep a master calendar in order to spread Spotlights out over the winter and spring. Spotlights will be announced in the eBlast so those who are interested can RSVP and then show up with business cards, to listen, learn and probably laugh. It is intended to be an informal time to share, learn and network.

February’s “Spotlight” will be on Leveraging Linked-In to its Fullest Potential. Bring your laptops on Friday, Feb. 19th, at 10:30AM to learn how to use LinkedIn as a marketing tool for your practice or job search. When my daughter-in-law, an MBA candidate at University of St. Thomas, did this last summer, attendees were surprised at how much they learned. Hopefully, this will be the first in a series of Spotlights on what members have found effective in social media marketing. I for one, need a refresher on Linked-In, and know there is more to share as we cover the basics. If you are already familiar with how to use social media effectively, stop by anyway if you’re in the Shoreview area (3550 N. Lexington Ave., Suite 106). Bring your coffee and insights to join the fun. RSVP to get directions to my office: miriamzachary@gmail.com, or text me at 612.598.0184. 
You will see how easy it is to host your own Spotlight so more of us can Network and Learn on the Go! Please let me know if you have any ideas for a Spotlight. It is fun, no-cost networking, so please join in.
 
Miriam Zachary, M.A., LMFT
MWP Executive Committee
ProfDev.MNWomeninPscychology@gmail.com
Subject Line: Miriam Zachary

Get Involved!

 

Membership Committee:

  1. We are in search of a Volunteer Coordinator! This individual would help gather information about those interested in volunteering with MWP, as well as help point individuals towards the various volunteer opportunities we have at MWP.
     
  2. Reach Out Volunteers. If you are looking for a low-key opportunity to get involved with MWP, you might consider signing up to reach out to other members. There is a lot of flexibility with the amount of time and the level of commitment you would like to contribute to this volunteer need. 
Please contact Membership Committee Chair, Laurie Nelson at llnelson56@gmail.com for further information.
 

Professional Development Committee:

  1. MWP Spotlight Series: Network and Learn on the Go. Our committee is looking for volunteer presenters! You can choose the topic, the time, and the place to present. MWP will advertise these events in our E-blast and newsletter.
    For more information, contact Miriam Zachary at profdev.mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com
     
  2.  MWP will be hosting another Specialization Workshop in either late March or early April at The University of St. Thomas. We will be in need of volunteer presenters for the workshop. If you would like to share your story about how you came into your specialty and other aspects of your work,
    you can contact Mary Clare at mcblindsley@gmail.com.

The MWP Mentoring Program:
An Inside Look

 
Mentoring is the perfect opportunity to offer advice, guidance, and assistance by sharing your journey and experiences. The annual MWP Meet Up and Match Up event took place on January 20th at Como Park Grill. This event brings mentor and mentee together in an efficient and effective way. It is a formal process we use to create matches – akin to speed dating. We have observed that the direct, face to face connection helps both mentors and mentees with selecting and being selected.
 
Our structured event gave each mentor a chance to get to know the mentees in a small group setting. We reviewed mentoring expectations, goals to achieve, frequency and duration of meetings, measuring success, overcoming conflict, creating effective alliances and termination. Our intention is to assist in the creation and experience of the mentoring relationship.
 
This year, Cathy Skrip shared about her past mentoring experiences. She encouraged participants to be mindful of what draws them to a particular mentor. She highlighted the benefits of getting to know the mentee on both a professional and personal level. Cathy pointed out the advantages of a mentoring relationship not only to the mentee, but also the mentor. The mentoring relationship will develop according to the needs of each, whether that means a formal meeting in the office monthly or an informal meeting for meals, lectures, or social events.
Cathy has been an active member of MWP for many years and is presently mentoring three women.
We currently have six mentors and nine mentees, and the matching process is underway.
 
We would like to thank all who attended the event and personally thank all the mentors for offering their time and wisdom— Susan Whalen, Miriam Zachary, Katheleen Avila, Laura Trippet Dodge, Charme Davidson, and Judith Lies.
 
The mentoring program is ongoing and matches can take place throughout the year. We are still looking for more women to fill the role of mentor. If you are interested in being a mentor, please contact Hanin Ailabouni at profdev.mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com (Attn: Hanin Ailabouni) to learn more! We hope to follow up at the end of the year to hear how the relationships are working and what the challenges are. We look forward to hearing about creative ways in which these mentoring relationships have evolved!
 
by Hanin Ailabouni, M.S. Ed., LPC, NCC
Vice Chair of Minnesota Women in Psychology
Owner of Integrative Wellness Counseling LLC

Contributors to this Issue

Hanin Ailabouni, M.S. Ed., LPC, NCC
Jennifer Fallon, Ph.D., LP
Beth Johnson, LAMFT
Laurie Nelson, LICSW
Deb Rich, Ph.D., LP, CPLC
Leslie Root, M.A., LMFT
 
Beth Siegel, M.A.
Farren Swanson, M.A., LMFT
Felixia Valerius, M.A.
Susan Whalen, LICSW
Miriam Zachary, M.A., LMFT
Newsletter Editor
Farren Swanson, M.A., LMFT
newsletter.mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com
Production Coordinator
Susan Johnson
mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com
Web Site
www.mnwomeninpsychology.org
 
The MWP Newsletter is published four times a year by Minnesota Women in Psychology for its members. All articles and announcements may be edited to conform to space limitations or to improve clarity, without permission of writers. Contributors are given credit via byline. Email articles and items of interest to newsletter.mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com. Be sure to include “Newsletter” in the subject line.

Advertising Guidelines: Ads must be of interest to women psychologists, and MWP reserves the right to reject or edit advertising. Publication of any advertising does not constitute endorsement; advertising by therapists must follow APA guidelines. Cost: Ads will be accepted in increments of business card size (2” x 3 ½”); cost of one business-card-size ad is $20, two—$35, three—$50, four—$60, etc., up to $100 for 8-card-size, equivalent of a full-page ad. All advertising must be prepaid. Procedures: Ads must be camera ready and fit the requirement of increments of business card size. Submit by the newsletter deadline to: mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com or MWP, 5244 114th Ave, Clear Lake, MN 55319.

2015-2016 Executive Committee
Susan Whalen, LICSW; chair
Hanin Ailabouni, M.S. Ed.; vice-chair
Deb Beemer, M.A., LPC; treasurer
Farren Swanson, M.A., LMFT; newsletter editor
Jennifer Fallon, Ph.D., LP

Beth Johnson, LAMFT
Laurie Nelson, LICSW
Deb Rich, Ph.D., LP
Leslie Root, M.A., LMFT
Felixia Valerius, M.A.
Beth Siegel, M.A.
Miriam Zachary, M.A., LMFT

Regular & Retired Membership in MWP is available to women who hold either a Master’s or doctoral degree in one of the fields of mental health or a related field from a regionally accredited institution and eligible for licensure in Minnesota in one of the fields of mental health.

Student Membership in MWP is available to women who are in the process of becoming a licensed mental health professional who have not yet earned a graduate degree. Student members are not voting members of the organization. Student representatives on Executive Committee may participate in consensus votes within Executive Committee but may never participate to break a tie vote.

Annual dues are based on a sliding scale according to the annual income of the member, currently ranging from $30 to $80 per year. Membership applications are available by emailing the MWP office at mnwomeninpsychology@gmail.com or on the website at www.mnwomeninpsychology.org.
Monday, February 8
Executive Committee

7:00-9:00 PM
Networking/Socialization at 6:30 PM
Location: Como Park Grill
1341 Pascal St, St Paul
FFI: Susan at whalen.susan@comcast.net

Wednesday, February 10
Conversation on Referrals and Backup
for Pre-Retiring and Seasoned Therapists

7:00-9:00 PM
Location: Minneapolis, Kathy Johnson's home
Fee: $25
RSVP: Ruth at rumark@aol.com or 651.222.5457

Friday, February 19
MWP Spotlight Series
"Leveraging Linked-In to its Fullest Potential

10:30 AM
Location: 3550 N Lexington Ave Ste 106, Shoreview
RSVP: miriamzachary@gmail.com or text 612.598.0184

Saturday, February 20
Private Practice Group

9:00-11:00 AM
Location: The Wedge Table
2412 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis
FFI: Heather, text 612.460.5799
email heather@heatherholt.net

Saturday, February 20
Student Group

12:30 PM
Location: Amore Coffee
FFI: Kyja at kyja.foster@gmail.com
or Beth at bsiegel0618@gmail.com
 
Saturday, March 12
Private Practice Group

9:00-11:00 AM
Location: The Wedge Table
2412 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis
FFI: Heather, text 612.460.5799
email heather@heatherholt.net

Monday, March 14
Executive Committee/All Committee Meeting

7:00-9:00 PM
Networking/Socialization at 6:30 PM
Location: Como Park Grill
1341 Pascal St, St Paul
FFI: Susan at whalen.susan@comcast.net

Saturday, March 19
Student Group

12:30 PM
Location: Amore Coffee
FFI: Kyja at kyja.foster@gmail.com
or Beth at bsiegel0618@gmail.com

Saturday, March 26
Social Action Book Discussion
1:30-3:00 PM
Book: “Half of a Yellow Sun”, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Location: Pinnacle Behavioral Healthcare LLC, 7250 France Avenue #302, Edina
FFI: Jane Whiteside at janewhiteside@earthlink.net
 
Saturday, April 9
Private Practice Group

9:00-11:00 AM
Location: The Wedge Table
2412 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis
FFI: Heather, text 612.460.5799
email heather@heatherholt.net

Monday, April 11
Executive Committee

7:00-9:00 PM
Networking/Socialization at 6:30 PM
Location: Como Park Grill
1341 Pascal St, St Paul
FFI: Susan at whalen.susan@comcast.net

Friday, April 15
Reproductive Health Workshop
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
CEU Credits
Watch for more information

Saturday, April 16
Student Group

12:30 PM
Location: Amore Coffee
FFI: Kyja at kyja.foster@gmail.com
or Beth at bsiegel0618@gmail.com

Thursday, April 26
MWP Annual Meeting
4:00 - 7:00 PM
International Market Square
 
Copyright © 2016 Minnesota Women in Psychology, All rights reserved.


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