Copy
September 2017 CHA Newsletter
View this email in your browser

The Calgary Heritage Authority is now on Facebook!

Give us a "like" to stay up to date on all things heritage.

On Aug 6, 2017 the Calgary Heritage Authority hosted "Children Draw Canada" which was our Canada 150 project. We invited local kids and artists to paint what Canada means to them.

The artwork is on display at the Calgary Municipal building on the corner of 3 St and 7 Ave SE (across from the New Central Library) until November. Thanks to the City of Calgary for partnering with us.

This project has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada.

CBC Toronto: Toronto could add 258 buildings to heritage register in unprecedented step

The city is taking an unprecedented step to give more than 250 midtown Toronto properties heritage status in one fell swoop, a move that's taking some owners by surprise.

The Toronto Preservation Board voted unanimously to approve the first phase of its "Midtown in Focus" plan, which adds 258 properties on Yonge Street, Eglinton and Bayview Avenues and Mount Pleasant Road to its heritage register.

The plan still has to be approved by city council, but Coun. Josh Matlow says he's confident it will pass, something that could maintain many of the low-slung brick buildings that line those streets. The full list of buildings can be found here.

"The majority of councillors recognize that Toronto has a shameful legacy when it comes to heritage preservation," Matlow told CBC Toronto.

"Far too many architecturally or culturally important properties have been lost to the wrecking ball."

The city has been stung by the loss of at least two century-old buildings — including an old Bank of Montreal branch and the former Stollerys building — in recent years. Without heritage protection, developers could easily get a demolition permit from the city.

If the buildings are added to the heritage register, the city would get at least 60 days to potentially block future demolitions.

Matlow said the city is moving quickly and, until now, quietly to protect the buildings so property owners don't try to get rid of them before the new rules take effect.

Edmonton Journal: Paula Simons: City council should be accountable for heritage demolition decisions

In 2016, Edmonton city council allowed the demolition of 12 different heritage buildings on the city’s official Inventory of Historic Resources

And the pace of demolition seems to be speeding up.

Council green-lighted the demolition of another nine buildings on the historic resources inventory in the first half of 2017.

That’s 21 of the city’s most special heritage buildings, gone in less than 18 months.

Of those, 15 were private homes while 16 were commercial buildings.

They include houses, large and small, that once stood in Garneau and Glenora and Crestwood and Highlands and McKernan and Queen Alexandra.

But we only know that thanks to the dogged investigative reporting of my Edmonton Journal/Edmonton Sun colleague Elise Stolte. For months now, Stolte has been filing freedom of information, or FOIP, requests with city hall, trying to get access to the previously private memos sent to city councillors by senior city managers. 

She’s just won a major moral victory — not just for Postmedia, but for all Edmontonians. From now on, the city is now promising it will release such memos — from May 1 of this year, onward — on all sorts of subjects, in a searchable database, one we can all read.

While combing through a batch of such memos, Stolte found one that outlined the pace of heritage demolitions.

I’m pleased the city has agreed to make most of its internal memos, whether they’re on traffic flow or bus replacement or infill projections, available to the public in the future.

But there’s a catch. We’ll only get to see the memos two months after they’ve been written, after the city’s own FOIP staff have ensured that they contain no sensitive private information and approve them for release.

And in the case of heritage buildings facing demolition? That may be two months too late.

The Inventory of Historic Resources is supposed to be a list of the city’s most important heritage buildings, whether they are private, commercial, or public. Each building on the list has been carefully evaluated for its architectural integrity, its relevance to social history and its importance to our urban landscape.

No one can demolish such a building without the permission and blessing of city council. But councillors rarely say no — because if they deny the demolition permit, they have to compensate the building’s owners, not just for the current value of the building, but for the hypothetical future value of the property, if it were developed.

Any time an owner applies for a demolition permit to knock down a building on the Inventory of Historic Resources, the city’s chief planner sends a memo to the mayor, to every city councillor and to the deputy city manager.

But not to us.

Sites added to the Inventory of Evaluated Historic Resources

 
The following sites were evaluated or re-evaluated for addition to the Inventory of Evaluated Historic Resources in June and approved by the CHA at the September board meeting.

George Befus Residence (1911) – 102 7 ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
As part of an assembly of two distinctive red-brick Edwardian Cottage-style homes, the George Befus Residence is a unique and well-crafted example of this style in the community.  (Style Value, Community Significance) The 1911 George Befus Residence possesses symbolic value for its association with its ethnic German builders, owners and residents. By the late 1800s the river flats south of Centre Avenue and area nearby were known as “Germantown”. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)

Alexander Befus Residence (1911) – 104 7 ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
As part of an assembly of two distinctive red-brick Edwardian Cottage-style homes, the Alexander Befus Residence is a unique example of this style in the community. (Style Value, Community Significance) The 1911 Alexander Befus Residence possesses symbolic value for its association with its ethnic German builders, owners and first residents. By the late 1800s the river flats south of Centre Avenue and area nearby were known as “Germantown”. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)

Gallelli Block (1912) – 212 4 ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The Gallelli Block, an early commercial-residential building on 4 ST NE, designed with a storefront below and suites above, possesses value for its mixed-use activity for over a century. (Activity Value, Community Significance) The 1912 mixed-use block also has symbolic value for its association with the ethnic immigrant groups who settled and established businesses in Bridgeland-Riverside at the turn of the 20th century. Most notable are its Italian builder, residents, owners and proprietors. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) The narrow, very deep commercial block is a distinctive example of the Edwardian Commercial Style is and one of few remaining examples in the community. (Style Value, Community Significance)

John K Kaiser Residence (1910) – 34 6 ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The John K Kaiser Residence, built in 1910, recalls the early development of Riverside as a working-class suburb settled mainly by ethnic Germans from Russia. (Symbolic Value—Community Significance) The property exemplifies the working-class housing built in this neighbourhood and around Calgary for the burgeoning pre-WWI population. (Symbolic Value—Community Significance) Like many such houses, it is in a simplified form of the Queen Anne Revival reflecting the economical manner by which vernacular homes endeavoured to emulate a fashionable high style. (Style Value—Community Significance)

Mauch Residence (1911) – 215 7A ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The Mauch Residence is a well-preserved example of the Queen Anne Revival Style in Bridgeland-Riverside. It employs the gable-front variation of this style, displayed by its prominent, full-width front gable with decorative patterned wooden shingles framed by a wooden frieze. (Style Value, Community Significance) The 1911 Mauch Residence possesses symbolic value for its association with its ethnic German-from-Russia builder, owners, and residents. Bridgeland-Riverside became defined by the immigrant populations who settled there: Ukrainians, Italians, Jews, and most substantially ethnic Germans, especially those from Russia. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)

Nurses Home, General Hospital (ca.1911) – 845 McPherson Rd NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
Nurses Home, General Hospital, built ca1910, recalls the early development of Bridgeland-Riverside, a working-class suburb settled mainly by European immigrants. In particular, it reflects the influence of the Calgary General Hospital, in Riverside, as a major local employer. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) This building’s continued use in a new location after 1949 represents the post-WWII development of Bridgeland-Riverside with the addition of infill housing on vacant lots. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) The building is an excellent example of a Foursquare, a common pre-WWI house style in Calgary, popular throughout North America, though rare in this neighbourhood. Typically used for single-family houses, this is a less common instance of the style employed for a larger, multi-unit building. (Style Value, Community Significance)

Rothermal Residence (1911) – 105 7 ST NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The Rothermal Residence possesses value as a well-preserved example of an Edwardian Cottage-Style home which has undergone an Inter-war ‘modernization’. (Style Value, Community Significance) The 1911 Rothermal Residence is valued for its association for over six decades with its ethnic German builder, owners, and residents. By the late 1800s the river flats south of Centre Avenue and area nearby were known as “Germantown”, and Bridgeland street names included Dresden and Munich (6 and 7) streets. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)

Wiggins Duplex (1911) – 412 & 414 8 St NE (Bridgeland/Riverside)
Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The Wiggins Duplex, built in 1911, recalls the early development of Bridgeland-Riverside as a working-class suburb settled mainly by European immigrants. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) This property exemplifies the entry of speculative, small-time builders into Calgary’s hot real estate market during its pre-WWI population boom. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) This building provides a good example of an Edwardian Cottage. But this property, built as a duplex with a symmetrical pair of outer front entrances, is a variant of the style that is unique in the neighbourhood and possibly in Calgary. (Style Value, Community Significance)
 

Calgary Heritage Events

Below is a listing of heritage events happening throughout the city. We are always happy to include the events of other organizations in our monthly newsletters. We only ask that you have them to us by the end of each month. Events can be sent to josh@calgaryheritageauthority.com.

Calgary Public Library Programs

To register: http://events.calgarypubliclibrary.com/programs/online-registration.

Genealogy for Beginners
Now is the time to start that family history project.  Join us for some pointers to get you started.
Monday September 18
6:30 -8:00 p.m.
Nose Hill Library
 
Our History Through Images: Chateau Montebello
Enjoy a glimpse of luxury Canadian-style in the Roaring Twenties by looking at Quebec’s Chateau Montebello in 1929.  Led by Dr. Rob Surdu, Mount Royal University
Monday September 18
7:00 p.m.
Crowfoot Library
 
Three Journeys By First Nations:  Leaders in 1886
Enjoy a presentation by Dr. Don Smith on Sir John A. Macdonald’s invitation to selected chiefs to visit Central Canada following the Riel Rebellion.  In partnership with Chinook Country Historical Society.
Tuesday September 26
7:00 p.m.
Central Library, Dutton Theatre
 
Dieppe: 75 Years Later
Learn about the planning, controversy, and aftermath of the dramatic 1942 raid on the French port of Dieppe which involved 5,000 troops.  Led by military historian Stephane Guevremont. 
Thursday September 28
7:00 p.m.
Central Library, Dutton Theatre
 
Family History Coaching
Drop in for help with genealogy research.  In partnership with the Alberta Family Histories Society. 
No registration required.
Last Saturday of the  month
September  30 and  Oct. 28
10:00 a.m.
Central Library, 4th floor
 
History Matters:  Martin Luther After 500 Years
Join Dr. Mark Konner as he asks the question: Is the life and legacy of Martin Luther relevant today?  In partnership with the University of Calgary
Sunday Oct. 1 2:00 – 3:30
Central Library, Dutton Theatre
 
50+ Lecture Series Program
History Under Construction: Seeing Calgary with a Photographer’s Eye
Join Judith Umbach as she presents her Calgary, seen through her photographic eye.
Crowfoot
Fri. Sept. 8 2-3:30pm
 
Register in person, online at calgarylibrary.ca/programs or phone 403 260-2620. 

VOLGA GERMAN CONFERENCE

Sept 16 - 9am - 2:30pm.  $10

Calgary Chapter American Historical Society of Germans from Russia
Ascension Lutheran Church, 1432 - 19 St. NE  Bring a bag lunch. 
Maximum registration - 65.  Anne: 403 246 6968 or Phil: 403 252 8537 by Sept 13. 
www.calgarychapterahsgr.ca
You can find all of our past newsletters here.

Copyright © 2017 Calgary Heritage Authority, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp