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January 2017 CHA Newsletter
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Hi Heritage Friends,

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You can also find all of our past newsletters here.

CBC: City council freezes 'wild west demolition' of downtown buildings


"Hundreds of buildings will be temporarily protected from demolition in the King Street West and Spadina Avenue area under a new motion passed by city council on Wednesday.

Joe Cressy, city councillor for Ward 20 Trinity-Spadina, said the one-year freeze on demolition of potentially historic addresses will buy time while a new heritage district plan is put in place.

"What we're trying to do is, as we grow, ensure that the growth and development reflects the unique character of King and Spadina," said Cressy on CBC Radio's Metro Morning.

The 303 buildings identified in the motion are primarily on main arteries like Richmond Street West, King Street West, and Adelaide Street West."

Calgary Herald: A look at five Calgary properties designated historic resources in 2016


"What does a 41-year-old wood-framed home with a large tropical garden have in common with a 107-year-old red-brick fire hall? City council believes both properties tell important stories of Calgary’s past. Elected officials voted to protect both buildings in perpetuity, amid a total of seven properties designated municipal historic resources in 2016 — a title that requires city council’s endorsement and legally protects the building from future demolition or dramatic renovation. The five publicly-owned properties and two city-owned fire halls added to the list in 2016 bring the number of heritage properties legally protected in Calgary to 75. Civic affairs reporter Annalise Klingbeil takes a quick look at five of the properties designated municipal historic resources in 2016."

Sites added to the Inventory of Evaluated Historic Resources

 
The following properties were evaluated or re-evaluated for addition to the City’s Inventory of Evaluated Historic Resources in November and approved by the CHA at the December board meeting.

Cross Residence (1912) – 1240 8 AV SE (Inglewood) Re-evaluated as a City Wide Historic Resource (CWHR)
It is an early and refined example of late nineteenth century Queen Anne Revival style architecture in Calgary, designed by prominent Calgary architect J. Llewellyn Wilson. (Style Value, City Wide Significance) It is associated with several members of the Cross family, particularly A. Ernest and Helen Cross and their children J.B. Cross, Mary Dover, and A.R. “Sandy” Cross, all of whom had a significant impact on Calgary’s economic and social life. (People Value, City Wide Significance) It recalls Inglewood’s role as the nucleus of early Calgary settlement, and its evolution as an industrial district known as “Brewery Flats.” (Symbolic Value, City Wide Significance) It well-known in Inglewood because of its substantial massing, its extensive lawn and gardens, and its highly visible location to all citizens at the intersection of 8th Avenue and 12th Street SE, the south end of the “Zoo Bridge” (12 Street SE Bridge). (Landmark Value, City Wide Significance)

Gerlitz Block (1912) – 402 6A ST NE (aka 728 2 AV NE) (Bridgeland) Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
With a red brick façade dominated by large storefront windows and pressed metal cornices, the Gerlitz Block is a good representative example in Bridgeland/Riverside of the modest Edwardian Commercial blocks built in Calgary’s outlying residential subdivisions during the economic boom of 1906-13. (Style Value, Community Significance) It recalls the early character and development of Bridgeland/Riverside as a culturally diverse, working-class residential suburb of Calgary. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) It has activity value for its original use as an independent corner grocery store, serving the daily shopping needs of Bridgeland/Riverside residents. (Activity Value, Community Significance) It is one of few commercial buildings constructed off Bridgeland/Riverside’s main retail streets of Edmonton Trail and 1st Avenue NE. Its substantial massing stands out on a corner lot of a predominantly residential area. (Landmark Value, Community Significance)

John Coventry Residence (1911) – 44 New ST SE (Inglewood) Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The John Coventry Residence, built in 1911, provides a tangible reminder of the historic development of Inglewood in the early 20th century as the city’s main industrial centre and residential area for railroad workers, factory workers, and other labourers who needed to live near their work places. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) This Edwardian Gable-Front house, of just one-and-one-half stories with half-width front cross-gable, is a variant of that style that is unusual in Calgary. (Style Value, Community Significance) Such modest houses represent the entry of speculative, small-time builders into Calgary’s hot housing market during its pre-WWI population boom. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)
 
McDowell Duplex (1912) – 219-221 7A ST NE (Bridgeland) Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
It is symbolic of the rapid growth of Bridgeland/Riverside as a working class suburb of Calgary, prior to the First World War. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) One of only two surviving duplexes built prior to the First World War in Bridgeland/Riverside, it has style value as a rare example of the restrained Queen Anne Free-Classic architecture found in working class neighbourhoods of the period. (Style Value, Community Significance) The structure is also unconventional in its plan and execution, and is the only example of a two-storey duplex of its era in Bridgeland/Riverside. (Community, Design Value)

Oscar England Residence (1911) – 46 New ST SE (Inglewood) Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
The Oscar England Residence, built in 1911, provides a tangible reminder of the historic development of Inglewood in the early 20th century as the city’s main industrial centre and residential area for railroad workers, factory workers, and other labourers who needed to live near their work places. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) This Edwardian Gable-Front house, of just one-and-one-half stories with half-width front cross-gable, is a variant of that style that is unusual in Calgary. (Style Value, Community Significance) Such modest houses represent the entry of speculative, small-time builders into Calgary’s hot housing market during its pre-WWI population boom. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance)

Rouleau Residence (1912) – 1240 8 AV SE (Mission) Re-evaluated as a City Wide Historic Resource (CWHR)
As one of the oldest known houses in Calgary, it is an early example in the city of modest Queen Anne Revival architecture with Free Classic variations. [Style Value, City Wide Significance] It serves as a reminder of the development of Mission as the nucleus of Calgary’s French-speaking Roman Catholic community, known as Rouleauville from 1899 to 1907. [Symbolic Value, City Wide Significance] It is associated with Dr. Édouard-Hector Rouleau, who lived with his family in this home from 1887 to about 1902. Dr. Rouleau was a distinguished physician and a strong advocate for the city’s nascent Francophone community. The village of Rouleauville (later Mission) was named after Dr. Rouleau and his brother, Judge Charles-Borromée Rouleau, in recognition of their contributions to the community. [Person Value, City Wide Significance] It is a landmark in the community of Mission, with a strong visual presence at the north end of the Talisman Pedestrian Bridge on 19th Avenue and 1st Street SW, and as part of a grouping of surrounding historic places. [Landmark Value, Community Significance]

Shuler’s Grocery (1912) – 1104 1 AV NE (Bridgeland)Evaluated as a Community Historic Resource (CHR)
It is a well-preserved example in Bridgeland/Riverside of the modest red brick Edwardian Commercial blocks built in Calgary’s outlying residential subdivisions during the economic boom of 1906-13. (Style Value, Community Significance)
It recalls the early character and development of Bridgeland/Riverside as a culturally diverse, working-class residential suburb of Calgary. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) It has been used for more than one century as an independent corner grocery store serving the daily shopping needs of Bridgeland/Riverside residents. (Activity Value, Community Significance) Located at the far east end of Bridgeland/Riverside’s 1st Avenue NE retail strip, it has become a landmark in the community, commanding a large corner lot on a predominantly residential block. (Landmark Value, Community Significance)

St. Mary’s Parish Hall / CNR Station (1905) – 141 18 AV SW (Mission) Re-evaluated as a City Wide Historic Resource (CWHR)
The Parish Hall is an early example of sandstone architecture in Calgary, built in the Edwardian Classical style. The Classical details, including four pilasters on the front façade and a heavy cornice with central pediment, contrast with the more functional railway architecture of the rear extensions. (Style Value, City Wide Significance) It has institutional value for its association, from 1905 to 1911, with the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, a missionary Roman Catholic congregation that established and operated the Notre Dame de la Paix mission (later St. Mary’s Parish) in Calgary. (Institutional Value, City Wide Significance) It recalls the early development of Mission as a French-speaking Roman Catholic settlement, known as Rouleauville from 1899 to 1907. (Symbolic Value, Community Significance) As a railway station for six decades operated by the Canadian Northern Railway (merged with Canadian National Railways in 1923), the structure has activity value for its use as a rail transportation hub for passengers traveling north to Edmonton and east to Winnipeg. (Activity Value, City Wide Significance) As the only surviving historic rail station, on its original site, it is a landmark in the community of Mission, and in the broader context as part of a landmark grouping of similar-scale buildings constructed under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Church. (Landmark Value, City Wide Significance)

Board Member Spotlight


Sami Houri is a senior research officer at Athabasca University with a focus on data analysis and statistics. His previous corporate experience spans various positions in business consulting including statistics, program evaluations, market research and project management. He holds a bachelor degree in Physics from the University of Toronto, an MBA from Memorial University of Newfoundland, a Certified Marketing Research Professional designation from the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association. He is currently in the final stages of his doctoral studies with a focus on Complexity Science applications in management, the coming together of his physics and business background. With an interest in history, Sami is an editor and regular contributor to a Lebanese Heritage page with about 50,000 members providing information, art and photographic records from the Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Arab, Ottoman, French Mandate and post independence eras of that country’s history. Today he is looking to contribute to heritage preservation in his chosen city, Calgary.

Trevor Kaiser is a born, raised and educated Calgarian where he met and married his wife who is also a native Calgarian. They currently share three children together. Trevor has been involved in the construction/renovation industry for over 25 years; during this time he have been fortunate to be part of hundreds of large and small projects. Trevor is a Red Seal Master Plumber and Gasfitter by trade, however he decided to give up the tools to work in management over 10 years ago. Currently he is as a Mechanical Service Manager for a Calgary Contractor where he is fortunate to maintain, renovate and repair buildings from all eras. Trevor has always had an interest for history and is very passionate about preserving it for other generations to enjoy.

Calgary Heritage Events

Below is a listing of heritage events happening throughout the city. We are always happy to include the events of other organizations in our monthly newsletters. We only ask that you have them to us by the end of each month. Events can be sent to josh@calgaryheritageauthority.com.
 
 
 
 
 

Get your story out there!

Broadcast and Print Media Skills Workshop for Heritage Advocates
The Calgary Heritage Initiative (CHI) invites you to join us for a one-day interactive workshop for heritage advocates, to teach you the ins-and-outs of how the media works.
  • Learn how to be prepared with your message and gain confidence in your delivery when newspaper, radio or television reporters seek reaction to a breaking news story like an impending demolition or protection through heritage designation. 
  • Train to be a media spokesperson, develop the skills to proactively plan, initiate and sustain successful relationships with the media. Learn how to develop interesting story ideas and pitch your stories to the media.
  • Practice delivering key messages with soundbites and quotable quotes on camera.
  • Receive a media contact list, tailored for heritage in Calgary; learn how to use it and keep it up to date.
  • Consider how media relations fits with your social media strategy and what reporters are looking for from your on-line presence.
Heritage advocacy is strengthened when our message is repeated. By working together, we will identify common objections to heritage preservation and brainstorm concise, credible, compelling and consistent responses.
 
Sign Up Now
 
 
Where: Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association, North Social Hall, 1320 5 Avenue NW
When: January 21, 2017 9:00AM to 4:00PM
Cost: $25 per person (includes lunch)*
Professional facilitator: Marilyn Jones, Media Training in Alberta. Marilyn is a media strategist with over 30 years’ experience, specializing in training not-for-profit organizations. Her passion is empowering mission-driven organizations and individuals to give their stories a voice through proactive media relations and the proficient use of on-line, open source content management systems.
Print Media Resource: Jeffrey Jones is a veteran journalist specializing in energy, finance and environment for The Globe and Mail’s Report on Business, based in Calgary. Before joining The Globe and Mail in 2013, he was a senior reporter for Reuters. Jeff is a CHI volunteer and resident of the historic community of Inglewood. 
Who should attend: Advocates of preserving heritage buildings, sites, historic streetscapes and community character in Calgary. This workshop will benefit CHI members, Community Association Planning Committee members, spokespersons for heritage societies in Calgary, and those working in heritage trades and professions. No prior media relations experience required.
Sponsored by the Calgary Heritage Initiative Society in partnership with the Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association with funding from the Calgary Foundation, Strategic Opportunities Program.

Register by January 16, 2017. Registration is limited to 25 participants – register early!

Questions? Contact Karen at 403 540 7796 or contact@calgaryheritage.org

*This workshop offers excellent value to participants.  Fees for similar one-day media training offered to the general public, and not customized for heritage, are about $250 per participant.
 
 
Typical One Day Media Training Workshop
  • Learn how the media work, what they need from you and when
  • Brainstorm, discuss, develop and pitch story ideas
  • Determine which reporters you should pitch based on your story ideas
  • Develop and deliver your key messages
  • Create supporting quotes and soundbites
  • Prepare and present compelling print and radio interviews
  • Prepare and present compelling television interviews
 
What you will EXPERIENCE:
  • On-camera and on-mic exercises
  • Interview control exercises
  • Realistic radio talk show interview exercises
  • Realistic TV news interview exercises
  • Realistic print interview exercises
What you will LEARN:
  • Explore how reporters work and what they need
  • Determine what the reporter’s audience wants
  • Develop story pitches to promote your organization’s mission
  • Respond to media interview requests
  • Set interview goals
  • Craft and deliver key messages
  • Deliver memorable sound bites and quotable quotes
  • React to various interview styles during in person and phone interviews
 
Your TAKE-AWAYS:
  • Take-home copies of videotaped interview exercise
  • A five-minute media interview planning card
  • A copy of the course materials at the workshop
  • Background readings and preparation exercises to review before and after the workshop
  • Access to media training videos for 30 days (two weeks before the workshop and two weeks after)
 
 
By the end of the day, you’ll have developed two or three compelling story ideas, pitched them to various “reporters” and feel comfortable, confident and capable of delivering your key messages and quotable quotes on camera forever more.
 
Sign Up Now
 
  
 
 
 
Chinook Country Historical Society January 2017
By Word of Mouth: Annie McDougall and the Writing of Latch String Out (Free Program)
Tuesday, January 24th 7:30 PM
FORT CALGARY, Officers' Mess 750-9th Avenue SE


George Colpitts - Professor of History, University of Calgary

A rare tribute to one of Alberta's first female pioneers, Annie McDougall. Latch String Out by Eleanor Luxton offers a rich record of stories collected directly from family embers and the region's earliest pioneers.

Calgary Chapter of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia

Cooking Demonstration - cabbage rolls - Sat. Jan 21, 11 AM
Ascension Lutheran Church, 1432 – 19 St NE,
Potluck lunch.  Library open; non-members welcome
www.calgarychapterahsgr.ca
Anne 403 246 6968 or Adena 403 273 8178
 

Mark the Date!

The Commonwealth Association of Museums is holding a pre-roundtable tour of indigenous heritage sites in Southern Alberta June 19-20, an Indigenous Heritage Roundtable June 21, and an international symposium on Heritage and Nation Building June 22-23, 2017. 

Explore the role of museums and heritage organisations in creating and promoting a national identity with colleagues from throughout the Commonwealth during Canada’s sesquicentennial year.

The Commonwealth Association of Museums is a Canadian not-for-profit corporation that supports museums and museum workers throughout the Commonwealth, with a focus on Commonwealth values, such as human rights and social justice, and the UN sustainable development goals.

For further information visit our website, or to volunteer on the local arrangements committee contact the Secretary-General Catherine C Cole in Edmonton at CatherineC.Cole@telus.net.






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