Copy

Welcome to the November Edition of the Healthy Schools
e-Newsletter 

 

Brought to you by Regina Area Health Promotion 
Saskatchewan Health Authority 


Please share with your administration, teachers, other school staff, and school community council.  There is something for everyone!   

French resources will be highlighted by 'FR.' 
Subscribe here!

November 2019 feature topic:
Screen Time

In this issue:

  1. Screen Time 
  2. Curriculum Connections and Activity Ideas (grades k-12) (FR & EN)
  3. October School Nutrition Poster: Canada's Food Guide 2019 - What Foods to Focus on (FR & EN)
  4. Community Programs and Resources:
  5. How to Connect with us

Screen Time

Recreational screen time refers to the time spent watching or listening to anything that has a screen outside of school or homework activities such as computers, iPods, vehicle DVD players, gaming systems, cell phones, tablets, and T.V.s (including T.V. on in the background during meal times).
 
According to 2018 SAYCW student health surveys, screen time among youth grades 7-9 has nearly doubled since 2015.

 
The data also showed that students who reported  getting fewer hours of sleep had higher screen time usage, said they were too tired to focus in school and had a lower school performance.

Reference: saycw.com/isl/uploads/2019/10/SAYCW-Newsletter-Oct-2019-Final.pdf 

So what?

Children under the age of 4 should not have more than 1 hour of screen time per day and ages 5-17, no more than 2 hours - according to the The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP).

When children are exposed to too much screen time at young ages, it is thought to impact social and physical development and mental health for the following reasons:
  • Interferes with development of problem solving skills.
  • Can cause speech and language delays
  • Has been linked to attention-, short-term memory-, and reading-problems.
  • Does NOT teach the child to self-regulate, calm or attend/persevere through things that aren’t full of bells and whistles.
  • Can cause eye strain and headaches.
  • Can lead to behavioural issues, lower self-esteem, and lower psychological well-being.
Teens and adults have also been affected by the spike in media consumption in that we spend less time:
  • reading, 
  • interacting with family and friends,
  • sleeping, and
  • being active. 
References: 
  1. CSEP. Canadian 24-hour Movement Guidelines. csepguidelines.ca 
  2. Speech and Language Kids.  Can Screentime Cause Speech Delays?www.speechandlanguagekids.com/screen-time-and-language-development 
  3. National Center for Health Research. Young Children and Screen Time.   www.center4research.org/young-children-screen-time-tv-computers-etc
  4. In Motion. Screentime and Mental Health. inmotion4life.ca/sleep-mental-health
  5. Science Daily. Is too much screentime harming children's vision?   www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180806162718.htm

What can the School do?

  • Use rest time for rest: Although TV can quiet kids, it doesn’t help them rest and will keep them from sleeping.
  • Let lunch time be for eatingand socializing: Eating while watching TV makes kids less in tune with whether they’re hungry or full, exposes them to advertising, and gives them less time to socialize, which is an important part of school.
  • Use recess for exercise: recess (indoor or outdoor) is an important time for kids to get physical activity and engage in unstructured activity. This is not only good for their physical health but will also help with focus and learning throughout the day. 
  • Check out some of these other strategies for schools to limit screen time from Action for Healthy Kids.
  • Develop a school policy or administrative procedure that regulates screen time use (Use this Step-by-step guide to get started. See sample policies and consequences HERE)
  • Once you have a draft policy, distribute a survey for parents to fill out to see what they think (Use this survey template as a guide)
  • Posters to download - post these Free Posters  around the school on why limiting screen use at school can benefit students
References:
Center on Media and Child Health. cmch.tv/my-childrens-school-uses-tv-during-rest-time-lunch-time-and-recess-what-should-i-do/ 
Screenagers - Away for the Day. www.awayfortheday.org/ 

Resources for Parents

Curriculum Connections and Activity Ideas


Screen Time


Kids Health - Classroom: Screen Time (grades k-2) 

Media Smarts (EN & FR) Learning for a Sustainable Future

 

November's School Nutrition Information Poster: Canada's Food Guide: What Foods to Focus on (FR + EN)

This Month's Nutrition Information Poster is: "Canada's Food Guide 2019 - What Foods to Focus on

French Poster coming soon - try this one for now: "Choix alimentaires sains
The Public Health Nutritionists of Saskatchewan have developed a nutrition information poster for each month of the school year. This information can be posted in the school, used in newsletters, as a part of school announcements, posted on the school website or used for Facebook or Twitter posts. Download French and English copies HERE

Upcoming School and Community Programs, Resources and Events

Turn off those screens and try...

School Health Grants

Have a good idea to promote health and wellbeing in your school but need a little extra funding to help get started? Check out this school nutrition, health and gardening grants list to see if any fit with your ideas. Grant application due dates vary throughout the year, and some accept them anytime.  (Mostly for anywhere in Saskatchewan, some specific to Regina)

The Business of Living Program (18+)


Dates and Times: Nov 19 - Dec 5 - Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday Afternoons from 1:30 – 4:30

Location: South Saskatchewan Independent Living Centre (SSILC) - 2220 Albert Street

Participants will learn how to:
  • Take care of business – How to open a bank account, get photo ID and hook up or cancel utilities.
  • Manage money – How to determine whether it’s something you need or want, how to create a realistic spending plan and identify spending patterns.
  • Manage safe and affordable housing – Learn what are your rights and responsibilities, housing checklist and resources.
  • Manage your health – How to find the right doctor, manage the impacts of disability and learn about prevention rather than living in crisis.
  • Buy good food for good prices – How to look for best buys, plan a menu, make nutritious meals.
To Register: Contact Holly Donohoe at 306 757-7452 ext. 226 or email holly@ssilc.ca 
 

Professional Development Videos

Health Promotion will be developing short professional development videos or webinars on a variety of health related topics to support professionals in their roles. Fill out this short survey to tell us what topics would be most useful for you.
Have your say HERE

Connect with us

Regina Area Health Promotion is here to support your school in health areas including: nutrition, physical activity, positive mental health, body image, and dental health. 
If you would like to share success stories or upcoming events related to health in our newsletter please let us know - Click on the 'envelope' symbol below.

CLICK HERE to view October's Edition  on 'Food Safety'
Click here for more on how Health Promotion can support your school
Subscribe here!
Saskatchewan Health Authority - Health Promotion - Regina Area

Our mailing address is: 
4211 Albert Street - 4th floor
Regina, SK S4S 3R6
Ph: 306-766-7370
email: healthpromotionrqhr@rqhealth.ca

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Thank you for reading






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Saskatchewan Health Authority, Health Promotion - Regina · 4211 Albert Street · Regina, Sk S4R 3R6 · Canada

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp