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“Science Cannot Live By and Unto Itself Alone”

A doctor’s “bedside manner” is an important component of the healing process, as is apparent to anyone who’s ever developed a trusting and collaborative relationship with their physician—or, conversely, felt slighted by a doctor who spent more time typing information into a tablet than talking with them. No matter how technically competent a physician might be, interpersonal and communication skills are so vital for patient care that they are a core competency required of medical students in residency programs.
 
Activities that are traditionally part of a humanities education, such as creative writing, close reading, and history, can help future doctors develop these skills, write Kaye Husbands FealingAubrey Deveny Incorvaia, and Richard Utz. Medical education has been a leader in incorporating the humanities with scientific and technical disciplines, but Husbands Fealing and her coauthors argue that this kind of integration should be part of a larger interdisciplinary transformation. 
 
Solving complex societal problems is never a purely technical or scientific matter. As Husbands Fealing and her coauthors write, “Society needs robust institutional frameworks for equipping STEM practitioners with a humanistic lens to elucidate problems, imagine solutions, and craft interventions.”

Read more about how forward-thinking science and technology policy depends on better integrating the humanities, arts, and social sciences.

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And be sure to listen to Kaye Husbands Fealing talk about her efforts to integrate humanities and social sciences with science and engineering on the latest episode of The Ongoing Transformation podcast.
TRANSPORTATION’S CLIMATE IMPACTS
Accelerating a Reduction in Vehicle Emissions
Dave Foster, John Koszewnik, Wallace Wade, and Ward Winer identify policy options that could more rapidly reduce carbon dioxide emissions from America’s vehicle fleet.
ARCHIVES
Remembering the Harrisons
Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison pioneered the field of ecological art through an extraordinary collaboration between art and science.
Plus: Open-source computing may be compelling from an innovation perspective, writes Michael J. Piore, but are developer networks closed to outsiders? And Laura Phillips-Sawyer makes the case that dealing with monopolistic practices in Big Tech will require “creative, forward-looking solutions.”
📅 ONLINE EVENT: TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 📅
SCIENCE FICTION / REAL POLICY BOOK CLUB

John Scalzi’s short novel Lock In raises questions about the “real” world, accessibility and disability, public health funding, and much more. On Tuesday, November 29, join Future Tense and Issues in Science and Technology to discuss the story and its real-world implications.

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FALL 2022 EDITION
The cover of the Fall 2022 ISSUES
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Note: The Issues newsletter will be taking a break next week (happy Thanksgiving!) but will return with new insights on December 2. 🦃
Header photo by Annie Spratt.
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Issues in Science and Technology is a publication of Arizona State University and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
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