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Ten Tidbits
 
At the University of Sussex they sculpt air into solid objects.
Pioneering research into Air sculpture will be at Bright Sparks both days.

 Ian B Dunne once lived with a killer plant. (One with teeth!)
He survived, to tell the tale on Thursday 16th.   
A chameleon’s tongue is twice the length of its body.
In humans that would be 4 metres long. Catch a chameleon at Bright Sparks
The word ‘trauma’ used to mean ‘cure’.
In ancient medicine, sometimes the disease was less painful than the treatment.  Simon Watt tells the gory story on Saturday 11th.

A piece of string can travel faster than the speed of sound.
Marty Jopson reveals the remarkable lives of ordinary objects on Friday 17th.

All the plastic things that have ever been made are still with us. 
They won't rot. See what gets washed up in Brighton on Saturday 19th
The actual shape of a falling raindrop is flat, like a pancake.
Use Minecraft to explore the water cycle as a raindrop on Monday 13th.
Isaac Newton invented the cat flap.
So it wasn't all fun and games for him. Catch his curious side on Sunday & Monday 13-14th
Snails can be trained to perform simple tasks around the garden.
See how far you can train a snail on Bright Sparks Saturday
The most interesting and liveliest part of a beach is between the wet and the dry, on the strand line.
Friends of Shoreham beach display at Bright Sparks Saturday.
The sentence “I never said she stole my money” has seven different meanings, depending on how you stress the words. (see Live Sentences!, Bright Sparks Sunday
There were actually eleven tidbits.
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Volunteers

We are still looking for helpers, especially for the Bright Sparks weekend on February 11-12. You can sign up by emailing. briscivol@gmail.com. All expenses are paid, and there are extra lashings of gratitude, snacks and lunch.

Visiting Brighton Science Festival

You’d be better off without a car. Parking in Brighton is a nightmare, so walk, jog, cycle, parachute or take public transport if you can; leave plenty of time if you can’t.

The brightest sparks...

... get there early. If you want to avoid the crowds at Bright Sparks give yourself plenty of time: kick mum and dad out of bed at 7 am. You know they like it really.

Tickets are selling well

Some events are sold out, so don't leave it too late. If they are sold out online there will be still be some available on the door for the following shows:
Bright Sparks Saturday 
Bright Sparks Sunday
Dr Death 
The Science of Everyday Life
Things that go bump in the mind
Smoke and Mirrors: 
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